Tentacles - Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBARI) Exhibit

GPO87

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I SAW IT!!! I have pictures... but they are nowhere as amazing as that one... cause I couldn't use flash! it was amazing! I must have stood in front of the tank for about 20 minutes.
 

DWhatley

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@Steve O'Shea mentioned on Facebook that they find tons of these beaks in whales but never seem to spot them with ROVs and submersibles. It is a headscratch as to why.
 

DWhatley

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Nothing common about this cuttlefish

Published on Jul 18, 2014
The common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) is anything but! It can change skin color and pattern almost instantly. It uses its skin to communicate—flashing stripes and patches of color convey threats or courtship messages. We've raised generations of them at the Aquarium!

 
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I had the chance to visit Tentacles a few weeks ago. Wonderfully made! Highly recommended to any ceph lover! I only wish I would have been able to see the vampire squid while I was there.
 

DWhatley

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Stumpy Cuttlefish on Exhibit!

Stumpy cuttlefish (Sepia bandensis) is a squat species that forages along the seafloor. It may be small, but it’s a mighty hunter. It hunkers down among rocks, coral, sand and algae, blending with its environment, then ambushes prey. Its native range is from Malaysia to the Philippines.

 

DWhatley

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Japetella Octopus On Exhibit

The Japetella octopus (Japetella sp.) is a beautiful animal that lives in the midwater realm, hundreds of feet below the surface but well above the sea floor. It has chromatophores that enable it to go from see-through with spots to almost a solid orange color. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's remotely operated vehicles have observed them on video in Monterey Bay and—even more often—on expeditions to the Gulf of California. Like many cephalopods, the midwater octopus can be fragile and short-lived, so we can't say when it will on exhibit next!

 

DWhatley

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Visitor from the Deep: the Cock-Eyed Squid

True to its name, this squid has two different-sized eyes, one much larger than the other. Scientists think the larger eye detects faint light that filters down from above, and the smaller one spots bioluminescence generated in the deep. They're collected with the help of our partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. Like many cephalopods, the cock-eyed squid can be fragile and short-lived, so we can't say when it will on exhibit next!

 

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