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why do octo's need 55 gallons?

DWhatley

Kraken
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AM, I would no more put my fingers in a crack in the ocean rock than I would offer my hand to a hunting moray eel (and is what you would likely do "noodling" for octopus). First (well not quite the first) rule of diving is never put your hands into anything. There are, of course, other creatures that would find your fingers tempting (even crabs would not likely resist wiggling fingers and many are NOT the size of a mithrax) but the worst damage (because of the locking teeth on most types of morays) is from a critter that likes exactly the same abode as an octopus. Nope, I will leave both fresh and saltwater noodling:

http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&type=ultra&fr=vmn&p=noodling+video&rs=2&fr2=rs-top

to people who don't need ten fingers to type for a living.
 
Joined
Sep 8, 2006
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2,390
Hey, I didn't say it was smart :smile: I've never found the idea of baiting large catfish with my fingers to be intelligent, and yeah, it would suck to snag something like an eel or a mantis shrimp. I didn't like the idea of letting my octopus get too good of a grip on my fingers in plain sight. All the same, I think it would be quite a thrill.

I've been pinched by nickel sized fiddlers and they are surprisingly stout little suckers. Wouldn't want to know what a baseball sized crab feels like.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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I wasn't going to bring it up but ... as I recall you were not too fond of things that go bump in the murky water either :biggrin2:
 
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For sure. I always hated swimming in the muddy river or any of the local lakes when I was a kid. Getting toes nibbled by small fish was creepy enough, but bumping into large unseen things in the ocean was rather unsettling. In my head I kept hearing the dive shop guy telling me, "there's a lot of nurse sharks around this time of year".
 
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
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672
In FL you are most likely to find the dwarf species O. Mercatoris and O. Joubini. If you catch a larger octo it might be a vulgaris, so be careful on the one you decide to take home.
 
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Finding an octopus and catching one by hand are two very different things. It would be easy to damage the octopus while you were trying to capture it. Eight arms clinging to its den are hard to remove :bonk:. Also, you will need some kind of license (fishing or collecting) in order to remove it from its environment. How would you transport the animal back to your home?
 

simple

Vampyroteuthis
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Oct 10, 2007
Messages
433
tom (a collector in the keys) usually has briareus available, if you look at the journal of "fluffy" on here you will see briareus are actually very good candidates for a pet. They can adapt to become pretty diurnal. Tom even offers trips in which you can go out with him and catch fish, and probably upon request octopuses, though it is probably quite pricey..
 

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