small octopus?

monty

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look for the thread "What skimmer do you have, an do you recommend it?" I think it's in the "Tank Talk" forum.
 

Neogonodactylus

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I check the tanks every day. I don't know about being a pro, but I can tell if the salinity is off, the pump not working, etc.

At U.C. Berkeley, as at all U.S. animal research facilities, vertebrates research animals require specific animal care and use permits and protocols. (I have served on one such committee for several years.) Invertebrates are not covered except when I keep animals in space that is approved and controlled for vertebrate use. With increased animal rights activity, some countries have begun to include invertebrates (cephalopods and lobsters) under their animal research use regulations. It is my understanding that this is the case in the U.K. and Australia is moving in that direction. From my experience, while there are a few vets out there who specialize in invertebrate issues, most are not trained in invertebrate care and maintenance and requiring veterinary care of cephalopods would greatly increase the cost with little or no improvement in the health and well-being of the animals.
 

Jean

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Neogonodactylus;116228 said:
I check the tanks every day. I don't know about being a pro, but I can tell if the salinity is off, the pump not working, etc.

At U.C. Berkeley, as at all U.S. animal research facilities, vertebrates research animals require specific animal care and use permits and protocols. (I have served on one such committee for several years.) Invertebrates are not covered except when I keep animals in space that is approved and controlled for vertebrate use. With increased animal rights activity, some countries have begun to include invertebrates (cephalopods and lobsters) under their animal research use regulations. It is my understanding that this is the case in the U.K. and Australia is moving in that direction. From my experience, while there are a few vets out there who specialize in invertebrate issues, most are not trained in invertebrate care and maintenance and requiring veterinary care of cephalopods would greatly increase the cost with little or no improvement in the health and well-being of the animals.

At our lab/aquarium the animals are checked at 8.30 am, 5pm and 10.30 pm by the on duty technician and also at other times by the students/staff working with them. In addition all staff and students (or someone they bribe......ummmm.ask to stand in for them if they're away!) holding animals must be available at all times to come out to the lab if there are major problems with their system (that includes the middle of the night!). We have a live in technician (the lab is some 22km from town) who has a pager linked to the seawater alarm system.

In NZ animal welfare legislation includes Cephs and lobsters but not other inverts. However, the University's own animal ethics approval protocols include ALL animals. And its a prolonged and intensive procedure to get it! We don't call the vets for any of our critters (not even the fish) as they really don't have the expertise required, we do. In fact vet nurses in training come to us for their fish care module and we sneak in invert care too!

j
 

iwun1

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Dust bunny I dont want to be offensive or meen but i just wanted to know have you ever had a saltwater tank before because octopuses are much harder then normal reefs and fish only tanks you can get a octopus as a starter if you do all the research but you may want to first try a reef to get familiar with brands filters feeding etc....
 

a dustball

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See I can't really get a reef tank or anything like that because both time and space are limited for me very much, if I get a reef and then the fish don't die before I get done with high school I won't get an octopus till after college, and for me that's going to be longer than 4 years. And I really don't think killing the fish myself is the right thing to do. I will only be able to purchase one tank. Lastly wouldn't there be a lot of work converting the tank and redoing the water levels?
 

iwun1

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You can trade the fish back to most lfs's so that can be covered if not you can leave them in the tank until you get the octopus and let it eat them i may do something like that but to cycle my tank.....Now the only thing wrong with that is the octopus can get stressed if the fish nip at it.Another possibility is getting coral you can have coral with a octopus and it would be a great way to get into the hobby i would recommend doing that for a few months or so before you get the octopus but you would have to get ones that dont require much light so you can put the octopus in later.Or the hardest way but it fits the solution perfectly is get a octopus and just doing loads of research:read:
 

Jean

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You can't put an octopus in with all corals, only with ones who a) don't sting and b) tolerate low light levels and remember every living thing you add to the tank increases the bioload! so be careful how much you add!

J
 

a dustball

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Would getting a bunch of shrimp and keeping them first work too? So I know there's coral and that's a living being, but what exactly is living rock and what does that do?
 
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Live rock is basically fossilized coral with lots of living organisms inside and out. It contains bacteria that is extremely beneficial to your filtration. Quality live rock is very porous and lightweight, and will bring lots of surprises with it. Some good, some bad. Copepods, amphipods, isopods, macro and micro algaes, sometimes corals, sometimes crabs, shrimp, and on occasion octopuses.
 

a dustball

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So also is there any kind of, crab, clam, shrimp or other animal I could buy and put in my tank that the octo won't eat, preferrably one that helps clean and stuff?
 

Redoc

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You could have a pencil urchin, a starfish, brittle star. I have a pistol shrimp that came on my live rock and some how it's avoided being eaten but thats not a recommendation its just luck.
 
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