• Welcome to TONMO, the premier cephalopod interest community, and birthplace of #WorldOctopusDay and #CephalopodAwarenessDays. Founded in 2000, we are a large community of experts, hobbyists and enthusiasts, some of whom come together when we host our biennial conference. To join in on the fun, sign up. You can also become a Supporter for just $50/year to remove all ads and enjoy other perks. Follow us on Twitter for more cephy goodness.

HELP! octopus layed eggs!

AD2U

Blue Ring
Registered
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
32
My octo layed eggs today. What do i do? How long does it take for them to hatch, or will they hatch? What can i do? She is protecting them. There is nothing in the tank that can eat them. HELP!
 

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2002
Messages
5,772
There's nothing to worry about and nothing to particully do, especially if your octopus laid small eggs. You can watch them and give us an update. Usually they take 4-6 weeks to hatch. You can continue offering the mother food - she may or may not accept it, or will eat only at times.

You can't hope to raise the little small-egg hatchlings, but you could try if your octo turns out to be a species that lays large eggs. You thought she was a vulgaris, which is a small-egg species.

Unfortunately, your octopus will not live long afterwards.

Nancy
 

AD2U

Blue Ring
Registered
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
32
Nancy;101116 said:
There's nothing to worry about and nothing you really have to do, especially if your octopus laid small eggs. You can watch them and give us an update. Usually they take 4-6 weeks to hatch. You can continue offering the mother food - she may or may not accept it, or will eat only at times.

You can't hope to raise the little small-egg hatchlings, but you could try if your octo turns out to be a species that lays large eggs. You thought she was a vulgaris, which is a small-egg species.

Unfortunately, your octopus will not live long afterwards.

Nancy
They are small eggs. I loved this octo to. She's awesome. :cry: Thanks.
 

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2002
Messages
5,772
Yes, it's a sad time for an octopus owner - and I think most of us do get attached to our octopuses. Just take of her, make her comfortable, and keep trying to offer food. Can you see her in her den?

Nancy
 

AD2U

Blue Ring
Registered
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
32
Nancy;101126 said:
Yes, it's a sad time for an octopus owner - and I think most of us do get attached to our octopuses. Just take of her, make her comfortable, and keep trying to offer food. Can you see her in her den?

Nancy
Yes, i can see her. She has been eating, but she stays close to her egg's.
 

sindas

Blue Ring
Registered
Joined
Sep 5, 2007
Messages
39
this is why i will never breed octos...

but if you think about it, she will be joining her mate int he big tank in the sky :wink:

think of the bright side, she got to have babies, wich is every mothers dream, sometimes...and she will be seeing her mate soon. and you have new babies that will grow up to be just like there proud mommy :wink:
 

sindas

Blue Ring
Registered
Joined
Sep 5, 2007
Messages
39
wait a minute...

i just read that near the end of there lives they can lay eggs. but unless your octo has been wiht a male before, it may be infertile eggs.

and, some octos will lay there eggs near the end of there life, so your octo may of already been near the end anyway.

and good news, some octos can live, if there lucky, a few weeks after the babies hatch.

of course i just read that in an article on here in 5 minutes when you guys have been doing this wya longer. but thats just what iread.
 

gjbarord

Sepia elegans
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 1, 2007
Messages
903
An octopus' life all leads up to reproduction (most animals do), and the subsequent end. It is the circle of life, if I may borrow an over used term. It may seem 'sad' but that is nature in all its glory. Life. Death. An octopus lays her eggs when she has the greatest fitness level and the highest energy levels, in order to properly tend the eggs for months at a time without eating.

Consider your self lucky that you are able to witness this event. This is nature at its finest, albeit in captivity, so enjoy every part of it (even the tough parts).

It is really no different than lampreys, pacific salmon, or certain marsupial mice. All evolved along a semelparous lines. Just great examples of adaptivity and diversity.

Greg:twocents:
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,973
AD,
Can you see the eggs well enough to gauge size (use a comparative, pin head, rice grain, snow pea ...) Also, can you count the number of eggs (100, 500, 1000). These are good clues as to whether or not you have a chance at raising some of the young. Generally speaking, the larger the egg and the fewer the number, the greater the chances of success. If they are fertile, and you can see them, you should start to see changes and little eyes develop (regardless of size or number). If you have a camera, photograph the eggs at least once a week and enlarge the pictures on the computer (then post them for the rest of us to enjoy).
 

Latest Posts

Forum statistics

Threads
20,944
Messages
207,038
Members
8,497
Latest member
annainbrooklyn

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV (2011): Terri
TONMOCON V (2013): Jean
TONMOCON VI (2015): Taollan
TONMOCON VII (2018): ekocak


Top