Euthanasia

DWhatley

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Greg,
It is my very uneducated thinking from film observations, one experience with a seahorse and reading on the net that some animals deteriorate outwardly while others die from internal shutdown without the observed decay (just growing old). Needing answers for this kind of quandry, I am prone to biased (not scientific) conclusions. I don't have the facilities to test and control an idea but am not shy about presenting what I tried and the results with the caveat that my attempt may have no bearing on the outcome.

What I would like someone with facilities to try is a week long oral introduction to antibiotics (given the no reproduction while or after taking antibiotic limits) before the anticipated decay. The thinking is that the antibiotics may help the immune system during a critical time. With a test and control group the desired results would be that the test group would die from something similar to heart attack where the control group would deteriorate from bacteria. If there is any merit to my thinking I would expect the test group to live longer and appear healthier but not avoid death from old age. This assumes that the observable deterioration is bacterial and not circulation shutdown or some other internally induced reaction (cancer).
 

Jean

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I agree I much prefer over anaethetising to freezing........but that's still better than decapitating which is used in some institutions :sad:

Anyhow an interesting paper is Moltchaniwskyj et al (2007) Ethical and welfare considerations when using cephalopods as experimental animals. Rev. Fish. Biol. Fisheries. vol 17, 455-476.


I have a pdf. Pm me if you want a copy.

J
 

monty

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Jean;104612 said:
I agree I much prefer over anaethetising to freezing........but that's still better than decapitating which is used in some institutions :sad:

How would one decapitate a cephalopod? It seems like that would involve extreme mangling, which doesn't sound very humane at all (although I guess it might be fast.) Bleh, maybe I don't even want to know :goofysca: but I must be missing something if it can be done in a way that anyone thinks is "humane."
 

gjbarord

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It is an accepted and humane way of euthanasia for a direct blow to the head for fishes. Decapitation, as I understand it, involves severing the cerebral spine which will shut off all activity to the brain thereby killing the animal. The methods may sound barbaric but are quite effective in both cases.

Greg
 
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monty;104614 said:
How would one decapitate a cephalopod? It seems like that would involve extreme mangling, which doesn't sound very humane at all (although I guess it might be fast.) Bleh, maybe I don't even want to know :goofysca: but I must be missing something if it can be done in a way that anyone thinks is "humane."

It's easier with squid and cuttlefish than with octopus...
 

monty

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cephalopod ethics and such paper

Mather JA, Anderson RC 2007) Ethics and invertebrates: a cephalopod perspective. Dis Aquat Organ. 75(2):119-29.

This paper first explores 3 philosophical bases for attitudes to invertebrates, Contractarian/Kantian, Utilitarian, and Rights-based, and what they lead us to conclude about how we use and care for these animals. We next discuss the problems of evaluating pain and suffering in invertebrates, pointing out that physiological responses to stress are widely similar across the animal kingdom and that most animals show behavioral responses to potentially painful stimuli. Since cephalopods are often used as a test group for consideration of pain, distress and proper conditions for captivity and handling, we evaluate their behavioral and cognitive capacities. Given these capacities, we then discuss practical issues: minimization of their pain and suffering during harvesting for food; ensuring that captive cephalopods are properly cared for, stimulated and allowed to live as full a life as possible; and, lastly, working for their conservation.

full PDF online:

http://www.int-res.com/articles/dao_oa/d075p119.pdf

as seen here: http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/2007/11/help_me_out_here_fellow_academ.php

but the discussion there is about legalities of copying articles (which I do have opinions on as well, see http://tech.caltech.edu/Tech2.0/11_12_2007/article21.html ) rather than ethics of cephalopods care. Whether invertebrates should be required to pay for any journal articles they read is left as an exercise for the reader.
 
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