Preserved squid sculptures!

Graeme

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What do you use to preserve them? If you steep them in Formalin for a few days/weeks, and then drain and wash them you can just send the preserved animal in the glass tank and add a label "Just add water!" The formalin inside the cells already means that it'll be pretty much indesrtuctible.

Graeme
 


Jean

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Graeme said:
What do you use to preserve them? If you steep them in Formalin for a few days/weeks, and then drain and wash them you can just send the preserved animal in the glass tank and add a label "Just add water!" The formalin inside the cells already means that it'll be pretty much indesrtuctible.

Graeme

Nope! for good preservation you need to store it in some form of alcohol....usually ethanol or isopropyl alcohol (the latter being the best!).

Water is a universal solvent and will eventually destroy your specimen!

J
 
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Jean said:
Nope! for good preservation you need to store it in some form of alcohol....usually ethanol or isopropyl alcohol (the latter being the best!).

Water is a usiversal solvent and will eventually destroy your specimen!

J

No more long baths, I'm washing with ethanol from now on!

Melissa
 

Jean

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um... said:
How about tequila? I'm going to have a nice new bar in my nice new basement in 2-3 months...

Well on my fourth year field trip we brought some specimens back for one of the academics........but as we hadn't planned to collect any specimens we had no preservative with us........so we went to the local hotel and bought a bottle of vodka (and one or two OTHER drinks at the bar :wink: ) which we used as a stop gap. But that's a very pricey way to preserve stuff!!!!!

J
 


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I use an alcohol soultion for preservation...Otherwise known as rubbing alcohol hehe...

I recall hearing somewhere that a long time ago, if a crew member on a boat dies they often place the body in a barrel of wine or alcohol, so it doesnt start rotting on the boat during a long voyage...
 

monty

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Paradox said:
I use an alcohol soultion for preservation...Otherwise known as rubbing alcohol hehe...

I recall hearing somewhere that a long time ago, if a crew member on a boat dies they often place the body in a barrel of wine or alcohol, so it doesnt start rotting on the boat during a long voyage...

Adds new meaning to the idea of a rum-sotted sailor... :arr:
 

Graeme

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Jean said:
Nope! for good preservation you need to store it in some form of alcohol....usually ethanol or isopropyl alcohol (the latter being the best!).

Water is a universal solvent and will eventually destroy your specimen!

J

But after its soaked in formalin, will it not be practically indestructable??
That was my understanding of the stuff. Once you get that nasty stuff right through a specimen, it turns to the consistency of leather.

Graeme
 

mucktopus

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Graeme said:
But after its soaked in formalin, will it not be practically indestructable??
That was my understanding of the stuff. Once you get that nasty stuff right through a specimen, it turns to the consistency of leather.

Graeme


It's true that formalin does wonders for helping the specimen hold its shape for a very long time, but eventually (over a hundred years) can turn the specimen to mush. Some of the original specimens from the Voyage of the HMS Challenger were preserved in gin, which did a great job for a long time, but eventually alcohol (especially at high concentrations) makes specimens brittle. A combination of fixing in formalin and preserving in alcohol seems to be the best bet. If you fix in formalin and preserve in water, the specimen can mold.
 

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