Nautilus's

Jean

Colossal Squid
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Squid are not a good option from the home aquarist! Super hard to keep, 1st up the tank must be cylindrical (square tanks are killers) they eat WAY more than octopus, they need even more space than cuttles or octis etc

they're really only kept by research institutes (& even there with limited success for some species)

Don't mean to sound too discouraging, but cuttles and octopus are more "home" friendly!!

j
 
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Thanks for all the replies you guys, and yes I am aware that there are irresponsible people out there that are buying nautiluses with no idea how to care for them but I am not one of them because I have deep care for marine life and with people also spilling all that crud inside the ocean just sickens me, and as for experience, I just want to make sure I can handle a ceph. Any choices for a beginner?
Also, my cousin kept some squids some years ago, he says they were easy to care for because he lived at a coastal city that had a fish bait shop near by that sold crayfish and crustaceans for fishbait very cheap. He's also had success with breeding them I think. Otherwise they were just tiny fish he put in there for them to eat, I dont remember, I was 17 at the time
 
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L8 2 RISE;122042 said:
Ok, now that that's done, most cephs actually only live 9-12 months. But I have to say, I don't know what it is with nautilus, I believe it is similar though.

Actually, their life span is quite unlike other cephs. Last thing I read gave an expectation on the order of 15 years.
 
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gholland;122046 said:
Actually, their life span is quite unlike other cephs. Last thing I read gave an expectation on the order of 15 years.

Yeah you're right, I just did some research on them saying their life span is unusually longer than most cephs, up to 15 years.
 
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L8 2 RISE;122042 said:
I have to say, you are probably the best person as far as preparedness to do what is necessary that has come onto these forums ready to get a ceph at a seconds notice since I joined.(that's a great thing:wink:) Most people either come on here to find out more before buying a ceph, or come bursting on here with no prior experience what so ever, and try to keep an animal in as small a tank as they can possibly come up with (usually 10-20 gallons) and then don't take advice very well AT ALL.

Ok, now that that's done, most cephs actually only live 9-12 months. But I have to say, I don't know what it is with nautilus, I believe it is similar though. As far as getting another ceph to prepare yourself for nautiluses, I don't personally think you need to. If you do have some prior expereince, you should be fine as long as, yet again, you do your research. If you can get your hands on a bimac, which seems very hard right now, I would suggest that as your "starter ceph", if you do decide to go down that path. I suggest this just because it's cold water as well, so should be easier to keep in the same environment without too many changes. I personally would prefer to heat up the water and get about 3-6 bandensis for the tank as they are more similar to nautilus along the evolutionary trail, and wont require any sort of different tank attention than nautilus apart from warmer water.

I'm sorry my posts are so long, I can't help it I guess :rolleyes:

Actually it wouldnt really matter if it was tropic water or cool water because im really all about plumbing and temp when it comes to aquarium building and setups, I have no idea why.:smile:
 

DWhatley

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Nautilusfreak;122049 said:
Actually it wouldnt really matter if it was tropic water or cool water because im really all about plumbing and temp when it comes to aquarium building and setups, I have no idea why.:smile:

However, changing the temp radically over a short period of time would effect you tank environment. Not necessarily bad depending upon what else is in the aquarium but it can cause a partial recycle. Also be aware that if you are cycling at 40 degrees, it will take longer to establish a stable environment that encouraging bacteria at 75 and slowly dropping the temperature. So even though you are at the two month mark you need to add additional time into the "is it soup yet" equasion.
 
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yes, im aware of changing the temperature too fast, but I ment I would keep the beginner octopus until I think im ready for a nautilus, then id donate it to old orchard aquarium, my trusty little mantis shrimp shop =). Cycling...its boring but it has to be done. Though I will have nothing in the tank except the live rock, octopus and later..a nautilus or two, and saltwater of course..hehe
 

DWhatley

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Though I will have nothing in the tank except the live rock, octopus and later..a nautilus or two, and saltwater of course..hehe

Oh, you will have a lot more than that if you have ocean live rock :biggrin2:. I see new stuff showing up all the time in my tanks (mostly sponges or one variety or another) that are a minimum of two years old.

I have only kept one cold tank and gave up on the inkling of a thought about a nautilus (I am not sure how people can think they are boring, I watched one at a pet shop for over an hour) because I disliked cleaning it more and more over the two + years I maintained it. When I lost my last Abdominalis (pot bellied seahorse), I turned off the chiller. Initially, we configured our 140 with the idea that it could go either way but by the time it was build and delivered we chose a warm water tank.
 
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Mhm, thats why most people call it live rock anyways, its full of life, usually aiptasia and anemone majano and other unwanted things. But thats just my luck.
 

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