Fluval Flex 32.5 Small octopus

Joined
Jan 18, 2021
Messages
2
I had originally thought to buy am larger aquarium, but decided to start smaller and get some experience with a salt water aquarium before getting an octopus.

I have a Fluval Flex 32.5 US Gal Aquarium. https://fluvalaquatics.com/us/flex-32/

The aquarium has been cycled and has 4 Blue Green Chromis. I will be adding several fish for the grandchildren. The fish will be removed before I get an octopus. I also have a terrarium with several Fiddler crabs in waiting.

All this is in preparation for an octopus. The Fluval Flex 32.5 comes with a built 3-stage, two chamber filter area.

To the built in filter system I have added a felt Filter (sheet) as a new first stage.

The first built-in filter is a large foam mechanical filter. This is followed by a carbon filter. The last filter before the protein skimmer is a Fluval Biomax filter.

The protein skimmer is a Fluval Sea PS 1 Protein Skimmer

At present the 50 watt Fluval Heater keeps the tank temperature at 22° C

The circulation pump is 214 US Gal/h.

I have been using the ATC refractometer as well as the Hanna HI98319 tester to measure salinity

I also use a “Saltwater Master Test Kit” to measure the Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate and ph values.

Temperature: 22° C, Salinity: 28, Ammonia:0.1, Nitrite:0, Nitrate:0, ph: 7.8

I have a 40 gallon RODI system to provide water for water changes.

To prevent the octopus from escaping I have added reinforcement around the filter area and filled any gaps with “Square Large Foam”.
The attached pictures show the aquarium and a top view showing the Skimmer.
 

Attachments

  • 1 IMG_0731.JPG
    1 IMG_0731.JPG
    2.2 MB · Views: 121
  • 2 IMG_0734.JPG
    2 IMG_0734.JPG
    2.1 MB · Views: 10
  • 3 IMG_0735.JPG
    3 IMG_0735.JPG
    1.2 MB · Views: 11

tonmo

Cthulhu
Staff member
Webmaster
Joined
May 30, 2000
Messages
10,498
nice setup, and thanks for sharing all the specs! Traditionally 32g is considered too small for an octopus, but I do understand it depends on species so there are exceptions... The problem with this is that it's very hard to get a confirmed species from an LFS -- they'll often attempt to identify it, but almost just as often get it wrong.
 

sedna

Larger Pacific Striped Octopus
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Messages
1,407
Looks like a great set up for dwarf species! As Tonmo points out, it’s hard to get a good ID from suppliers, but as long as you stick with dwarf species you should be fine. You’re off to a great start. I love my smaller Fluval EVO tanks, so I’m really going to enjoy following your progress with this one.
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2021
Messages
2
I decided to wait a while before getting the octopus, so bought a Cleanup Crew online from a reputable dealer, But!

I could not tell if all were alive. The dealer told me that it can take up to three days for all the critters to acclimate. That was surely correct for the Astraea Snails which took a long while to show movement. The Blue Leg Hermits and Nassarius Snails were all very active.

I waited; many of the Astraea Turbo Snails were dead and several of the Scarlet Reef Hermits. The Blue Leg Hermits and Nassarius Snails all seemed to live or at least most of them.

The crisis came when I removed the dead ones, Boy what a stink, Boy what a stink!

I measured the chemistry. I have been monitoring the chemistry every day and all the values were low.

Now the Nitrate was sky-high. I did a 40% water change to get things back to normal.

All the fish survived, but two Scarlet Reef Hermits died, I’m still waiting to see how this crisis ends.

I’ll buy all my critters local in the future, where I can see they are alive from the get-go.
 

sedna

Larger Pacific Striped Octopus
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Messages
1,407
I decided to wait a while before getting the octopus, so bought a Cleanup Crew online from a reputable dealer, But!

I could not tell if all were alive. The dealer told me that it can take up to three days for all the critters to acclimate. That was surely correct for the Astraea Snails which took a long while to show movement. The Blue Leg Hermits and Nassarius Snails were all very active.

I waited; many of the Astraea Turbo Snails were dead and several of the Scarlet Reef Hermits. The Blue Leg Hermits and Nassarius Snails all seemed to live or at least most of them.

The crisis came when I removed the dead ones, Boy what a stink, Boy what a stink!

I measured the chemistry. I have been monitoring the chemistry every day and all the values were low.

Now the Nitrate was sky-high. I did a 40% water change to get things back to normal.

All the fish survived, but two Scarlet Reef Hermits died, I’m still waiting to see how this crisis ends.

I’ll buy all my critters local in the future, where I can see they are alive from the get-go.
I know it can be disheartening, but you’re making the best choice in waiting! If it’s a Caribbean species you’re after, it’s better to wait until April, anyway- when the younger ones are available!
 

Top