Bimacs living over two years

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ob;82178 said:
for instance underfeeding (calorie restriction) certain rodents increases their life expectancy by 40%

Ha! Just talked about this in my Evolution class (currently discussing why we age/why genes that increase lifespan aren't fixed in populations). Interesting stuff indeed!

Cheers!
 


monty

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main_board;82230 said:
Ha! Just talked about this in my Evolution class (currently discussing why we age/why genes that increase lifespan aren't fixed in populations). Interesting stuff indeed!

Cheers!

A professor I had (John Allman) had a lot of interesting thought on this, particularly in primates... in particular, he put forth the interesting (but possibly not confirmed) theory that there is actually an evolutionary pressure for most, but not all, humans to die off when they're past prime working/reproducing age, so that a small number of old people are part of the tribe to remember the lessons learned over a long time, but not enough to be a burden on the resources of the tribe, since they're not able to contribute to hunting/gathering/farming/childrearing very much. Of course, modern lifestyles and medical stuff changes a lot of that, but I thought it was interesting that we normally think of failing health in old age as being that we're somehow flawed, rather than considering the possibility that that was actually an evolutionary "good thing" for survival of our genes in our offspring.
 

marineboy

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alien4fish, i love scripps aquarium and I know where the bimac is now since I was there recently.

They have switche dhim into the tidepool exhibit and have a show at around 3:00pm everyday (im not sure on this but when I went it was on the plan) where they feed him.

he is very pretty!
 
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monty;82241 said:
... he put forth the interesting (but possibly not confirmed) theory that there is actually an evolutionary pressure for most, but not all, humans to die off when they're past prime working/reproducing age, so that a small number of old people are part of the tribe to remember the lessons learned over a long time, but not enough to be a burden on the resources of the tribe, since they're not able to contribute to hunting/gathering/farming/childrearing very much. Of course, modern lifestyles and medical stuff changes a lot of that, but I thought it was interesting that we normally think of failing health in old age as being that we're somehow flawed, rather than considering the possibility that that was actually an evolutionary "good thing" for survival of our genes in our offspring.

Interesting indeed. What our prof has mainly discussed is that there are alleles in every natural population that do promote long life. However, there exists a tradeoff between longevity and reproductive success. The longer an organism lives, the less offspring are left; the shorter the lifespan, the more offspring are left. Its just the way the alleles and genes are set out. Thus there is slightly more selection towards a shorter life span for more offspring and more genes left behind. Invariably, though, some individuals do displace the other allele for long life, and this can be bred in a captive population so everyone lives long. Something I was thinking on my walk home from class today was what if instead of all this plastic surgrey, anti-aging skin care products, chemical peels, etc., why didn't we just encourage our own imbedded longevity genes? Now granted not every one has them and thus this could imply gene therapy which not everyone is for. However, the idea did strike me as worthy of some thought.

Cheers!
 

monty

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main_board;82367 said:
Interesting indeed. What our prof has mainly discussed is that there are alleles in every natural population that do promote long life. However, there exists a tradeoff between longevity and reproductive success. The longer an organism lives, the less offspring are left; the shorter the lifespan, the more offspring are left. Its just the way the alleles and genes are set out. Thus there is slightly more selection towards a shorter life span for more offspring and more genes left behind. Invariably, though, some individuals do displace the other allele for long life, and this can be bred in a captive population so everyone lives long. Something I was thinking on my walk home from class today was what if instead of all this plastic surgrey, anti-aging skin care products, chemical peels, etc., why didn't we just encourage our own imbedded longevity genes? Now granted not every one has them and thus this could imply gene therapy which not everyone is for. However, the idea did strike me as worthy of some thought.

Cheers!

I've heard some biologists talk about theories (I think these are both unproven) that some age related problems are caused by the telomeres getting chopped off at each cell division, and also the fact that mitochondra don't have the same genetic repair systems that nuclear DNA has, so mitochondrial DNA decays. I'm kinda skeptical, particularly about he mitochondria (since I've never heard an answer on why we wouldn't then inherit DNA-degraded DNA from our mothers) but those both also sound like they'd be more helpful to address than cosmetic surgery and the like.
 


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sorseress;82376 said:
The fewer offspring would be a good idea too.

Yeah, that's what really struck me during my walk. Most of us in the developed world who are looking at these anti-aging treatments are also some of the worlds lowest offspring producers. Why not combine the two into an elegant solution. And monty, the mitochondria theory reminds me of an ad thats been running in National Geographic recently. It's for a suppliment for "rejuvenates" mitochondria, resulting in more vitality and higher energy levels. They have some great before and after cartoons of mitochondria.

Cheers!
 

monty

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Random free association: I remember first hearing about (a fanciful version of) mitochondria in Madeline L'Engle's children's sci-fi book A Wind in the Door (sequel to A Wrinkle in Time) I still re-read a lot of her books every few years...
 

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