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[Octopus]: This is Omikron - Abdopus aculeatus

Nancy

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I just converted your 500 liter tank size to US gallons - it’s 132 gallons. That’s a good sized tank so you really would be able to have a larger octopus someday.
It’s also an advantage with a smaller octopus because your small octopus has less impact on the water quality (although you need to keep testing).

Nice corraline algae!

Nancy
 

DWhatley

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Here is a great shot of an aculeatus male's third curled arm,

I hope I have not confuses the concept of how much/often to do water changes. With a tank that large and fully cycled, once a week should be fine. Daily changes are only important for tanks that are too small for the animal received or tanks that received animals before being well cycled. With a 500 liter tank, the daily changes should not change the water parameters (the only real concern with too changing water too frequently) if that is easiest, no harm done but even 2 weeks (with larger changes) should be fine for the sized animal you have and a fully cycled tank that large.

I am worried it may not be eating enough and would encourage trying to stick feed half a thawed shrimp. Sometimes you have to get them accustomed to the offering and even ET will make me touch his inner suckers some days where he will come up, to the side of the tank, poke it with an arm tip and then decide he wants it on others.
 

Benjie

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These are great pics and very heplful indeed. In fact, this looks a lot different ... so probably female?

Thanks for the clarification on the water maintainance issue. We'll reduce that to weekly 10% change for now.

It was our plan to start srick feeding today, although I'm afraid it's still to shy for that... we'll see.

May I ask again if we should keep the dim "moonlight" LED or put it away completely?
May I also ask again how to change the thread's title?

Thanks to all, we really appreciate the support here!
 

DWhatley

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Oops, missed those questions. Let me know what you want as the title as only an moderator can change them (not sure why). Typically, I try to have members include the animal's name and species as the title so that anyone searching by either can easily find the thread.

Any night lighting should be red. No lighting is fine but if you want to observe at night red will not disturb the natural night awareness. For nocturnals, I recommend leaving a red light on all night but for diurnals leaving the tank totally dark after human bedtime is probably best. IME, red light does not seem to bother the nocturnals but they can detect it and will often wait for full lights out to hunt if there is an option. I don't recommend using blue moon lights at all. It may be that blue is actually bright to their eyes than white. For diurnals, blue or white all night is definitely stressful. One color setable nightlight we had would revert to blue if the power went out. We had a lot of thunderstorm related short outages while using it and it took me a few times to realize my octopus was nervously pacing when he should have been sleeping because the color had changed. After about the 5 time we saw him stressed, we eliminated that light.
 

Benjie

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Our first try with frozen food, this morning, went smoothly. It took a thawed shrimp (size of a thumbnail) after one or two minutes - but you really had to touch his arms for him to get in action. I find it strange that he's still pretty shy when we sit in front of the tank, but is not bothered by the feeding stick (and the hand on the other side of it) at all.

Thanks for the hint about the night light, it's off now permanently. Question: What would be the maximum light duration for the day? We'd love to have the opportunity to observe it in the mornings and evenings, so light could be an issue...

Time to reveal the name: Denise,would you please change the title to "This is Omikron (Abdopus aculeatus)" @DWhatley - thanks!

Fun fact: I could not find out the meaning of "A. aculeatus", so I asked a person fluid in Latin. Turns out "Abdopus" means "hidden, concealed" and "aculeatus" means "sharp" - "pointy" as well as "smart". (By the way, "omikron" means "small O" as opposed to omega, the "big O", but you all did know that, right?) You're welcome.
 

DWhatley

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Octopuses don't NEED anything more than ambient light but they will respond to a light cycle so I set my timers to come on when we get up and off when we go to bed. If your ambient light (ie there is a light on in the room) at night is not fully dark, I would suggest covering the tank if Omikron does not go to a den and sleep (generally this is not a problem if the room is pretty dark).

If I have a nocturnal, I set the daylight off time to when it is dark outside and try to keep the room lights off but have the red lights on all night.

I added your fun fact to our species notes for aculeatus
 

Benjie

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In the second week now, Omikron is still pretty shy. In her favorite den, where she spends most of the time, she peeks out and you can only spot the eyes, but she rarely comes out fully. She willingly takes frozen food, but as we see her mostly only once a day (in the morning), we can only feed her once. After this, she hides in one of the places where she cannot be seen to digest mostly for the rest of the day. In the evening, we occasionally see her sitting on a pane, but when observed, she retracts again to one of her caves.


We think she could take more food, but on the other hand, there are still some shrimp and crabs in the tank which she ignores - so she can't be starving, right?
 

DWhatley

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We keep our octo tanks in the room where we eat. This gives them a long chance to observe calm behavior and adjust. As a follow on to @Nancy 's suggestion, if you can arrange to eat in the room or just read for an hour or so, this may help.

There is at least one of the Abdopus genus that is smaller than aculeatus and is nocturnal. I don't know the species (or if it has been named) but if the evening/early morning appearances continue after a month in the tank, this may be the nocturnal relative.
 

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