• Looking to buy a cephalopod? Check out Tomh's Cephs Forum, and this post in particular shares important info about our policies as it relates to responsible ceph-keeping.

Pygmy Atlantic Octopus care

d



Oh yes, if your octo is nocturnal, it may be better to interact at night.
I tried, he had zero interest in interacting. He saw my hand go in and took off. I’ll give him some space and try again in a week or two.

I have a question for you guys. I’m thinking of setting up a larger tank for a bimac at some point. If I buy a used tank, do I need to be concerned about the tank’s history? Namely, if the tank has ever been treated with copper or other things bad for an octopus, will that tank be ruined forever? Or is it ok if I just clean it very well.
 
I have a question for you guys. I’m thinking of setting up a larger tank for a bimac at some point. If I buy a used tank, do I need to be concerned about the tank’s history? Namely, if the tank has ever been treated with copper or other things bad for an octopus, will that tank be ruined forever? Or is it ok if I just clean it very well.


Definitely clean it thoroughly, as you said. Once cleaned, I wouldn't worry so much about previous medication treatments. My biggest worry with old tanks is exactly how old is it? If glass, are the seams in good condition? Glass tanks that once held water and were emptied and left in a basement for years are worrisome as the seams can become brittle and lead to leaks. Have there been any previous issues with the tank (leaks, etc)? So long as you do your due diligence, a recycled tank should work out for a bimac.
 
I tried, he had zero interest in interacting. He saw my hand go in and took off. I’ll give him some space and try again in a week or two.

I have a question for you guys. I’m thinking of setting up a larger tank for a bimac at some point. If I buy a used tank, do I need to be concerned about the tank’s history? Namely, if the tank has ever been treated with copper or other things bad for an octopus, will that tank be ruined forever? Or is it ok if I just clean it very well.

Another way to test if the tank is leeching copper into the water is to set the tank up with salt water as you would normally mix it, and then add some Cuprisorb in a filter media bag and let the tank run for a few days. Cuprisorb turns blue/green when it interacts with copper, and that should tell you if you have any copper in the water or not. If you cycle the tank for a few days and the Cuprisorb doesn't change color, then you should be good to go.
 
So unfortunately this afternoon I found the octopus dead. I tested alk, salinity, and a few other parameters and all were normal and unchanged. I suppose it’s possible that I didn’t do anything wrong, but I still feel pretty guilty. I would like to have another octopus but I’m thinking I might prefer to set up a larger tank so that I can go with a longer lived species. Is there anyway for me to confirm if he died of age or if it was something I caused?
 
I’m really sorry to hear that your animal passed away :( an unfortunate reality of keeping these animals in an aquarium is that they just don’t live for all that long, especially if they were collected from the wild as an adult. It’s always hard to lose a member of the family.

Aside from doing a full autopsy, the only thing you can really look at is the state of the body when it died. Was it missing any arm tips or arms entirely? Was it’s mantle receded and curled up in the back where the siphon comes out?

Don’t let this situation discourage you from trying again. Most cephalopods live for less than a year and a half so yours very well could have been collected near the end of its life. If your water parameters were all within range and you fed the animal when it was hungry and it had a normal light cycle, then you did all you could. Hopefully you learned a few things and you will have an ever better experience with your next octopus!
 
I’m really sorry to hear that your animal passed away :( an unfortunate reality of keeping these animals in an aquarium is that they just don’t live for all that long, especially if they were collected from the wild as an adult. It’s always hard to lose a member of the family.

Aside from doing a full autopsy, the only thing you can really look at is the state of the body when it died. Was it missing any arm tips or arms entirely? Was it’s mantle receded and curled up in the back where the siphon comes out?

Don’t let this situation discourage you from trying again. Most cephalopods live for less than a year and a half so yours very well could have been collected near the end of its life. If your water parameters were all within range and you fed the animal when it was hungry and it had a normal light cycle, then you did all you could. Hopefully you learned a few things and you will have an ever better experience with your next octopus!

The body looked pretty normal to me. No missing legs or cuts or tears. I don’t think the mantle was receded, but I’m not positive.

Thank you for your kind words, that does make me feel a bit better! Id like to try another pygmy (joubini) but the only place I can find them for sale is salty bottom reef company who collects them, but I would rather find a captive bred one. Does anyone know somewhere that sells them captive bred?
 

Trending content

Shop Amazon

Shop Amazon
Shop Amazon; support TONMO!
Shop Amazon
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites.
Back
Top