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Ok, not mercs.

tywtly

GPO
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Dec 12, 2006
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156
Well, I've decided against mercs. They are too small, I'm worried I'd never see them. I'm thinking now about briareus or aculeatus. Which would be better for a 29 gallon tank, and what do I need to take care of them. I need a list of equipment/supplies for taking care of them, please. Thanks in advance

-Ty
 

corw314

Colossal Squid
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Everything you need to know will be found here...Cephalopod Care Articles, Ceph Care...all your questions will be thoroughly answered!
 

monty

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tywtly;87382 said:
Well, I've decided against mercs. They are too small, I'm worried I'd never see them. I'm thinking now about briareus or aculeatus. Which would be better for a 29 gallon tank, and what do I need to take care of them. I need a list of equipment/supplies for taking care of them, please. Thanks in advance

-Ty
29 gallons is pretty much too small for a briareus, and maybe both of those species. The standard rule around here is 55-75 gal for non-dwarf species of octo, at least biareus and bimac.
 

tywtly

GPO
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Dec 12, 2006
Messages
156
Well, what would be the perfect octo for this tank? I don't really care what species I get, I just want an octo. I want one I'll be able to see a lot. I know this isn't common, but maybe just a species that is more social and not so shy, that I would at least see more than other species. I know I sound picky, and I'm sorry, but I am just really confused over all this.
 
Joined
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Whether an octopus is shy or not depends on a variety of factors, including the individual personality of the octopus. It may take several weeks for your octopus to adjust to its new home and feel comfortable enough to interact with you. Often the LFS has incorrectly labeled the octopus, so even choosing a particular species may not help.

It is kind of like having a human baby, you never know what they are going to be like until they arrive.
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Dec 22, 2004
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There's more or less two octopus strategies people use:

Low cost, low risk, low gain: Get an affordable, smallish tank (~29 gallons) and a dwarf like O. mercatoris. You probably won't see much of it, but it'll be cool to have and you didn't blow too much money.

High cost, high risk, high gain: Get a monster tank and go all out on the filter for a bigger species like O. bimaculoides or O. briareus. These tend to be more social but we're talking about 55, 75 gallon tanks and up.

Its like anything else in life--a compromise between cost, effort and enjoyment. Its ultimately up to you to decide what path you want to take.
 

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