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Mangrove Tree Questions

Castor

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Hi all, I am doing some research on the use of mangrove trees. I have found quite a bit of anecdotal information on the net, but I thought I would go to the source of all things aquatic, you guys! :biggrin2:

Any information will be greatly appreciated! I am leaning towards using them, and am just doing my preliminary research.

Thanks!

On a side bar, I am considering a name for the new tank, it's a 90gal tall, and so far I have come up with "Achondroplasic Ocean." Anymore suggestions?

Felix, El Gato!
 

Castor

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So... whadda ya think? I wanted to ask first, as I know this name may offend people.

As far as the mangrove trees, I plan a refeugum with a dedicated mud substrate. I like the idea of the little trees, but I'm not sure how beneficial they would be.

Felix
 

DHyslop

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I think you'd need an awful lot of them to be really effective, particularly for a ceph tank. I'm under the impression that all the ways to get NNR--be they sand beds, macroalgae or mangroves, are slow and gradual processes.

You can plant a couple and see if you can measure a difference, but I really think you need a load of them to do much good. Someday I'd like to have a 100 gallon rubbermaid stock tank in a basement with a small mangrove forest in it.

Dan
 

Castor

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I've neverthought of that! Do you think a low flow system would work? I have the space for it, but it might be an eye-sore to Carole. Hmm... that would be a nice valentines gift for her. :wink: I'll keep a lot of notes. Any other input would be greatly appreciated (sp?).
 

DHyslop

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If you look around Reef Central I'm sure you can find a few mangrove systems. Low flow would be fine...there's no reason to have a thousand gallons per hour going through. I'm of the opinion most people have way too much flow through their sumps.

One thing to think about is mangroves aren't too cheap, maybe you could find a bulk supplier, though.

Dan
 

Castor

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Hmm... that's a good question, I am fairly sure they can be planted in normal soil. As long as they are from the area. The tree takes up the salt with the water, but can shed the salt through their leaves, and just drop away the leaves, and in my research I have read that they will grow with a fresh water source, so they don't actually need the salt. I wonder what that would do to the salinity of a tank?
 

Colin

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I have only ever kept two mangroves, got them as pods at the same time, one did nothing and died but i still have the other to this day. It is in a sump tank at my dad's house.

They grow very slowly and even after two years is only about 18" high with about 6 leaves. Some people keep nipping off leaves to leave one at a time to inhibit growth. I only ever bought them to have them and not for filtration reasons.

I think, depending on tank size, that you would need a stack of them to be of any use and good lights, mine gets light from a twin 150watt MH with 2x 54watt actinics... probably too 'blue' for good plant growth, a grolux might be better?

Make sure you wash the leaves with freshwater when you can to keep them free of salt.

C
 

Feelers

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I have had a browse around forums on the mangrove topic and as above, for nutrient export they dont seem very useful. They are cool plants none the less, but for removing nutrients you need something fast growing otherwise there isnt much point. Have you thought about one of the macroalgaes? (Capulera is the most common one). Grows real quick and you know that it must be pulling something out of the water. There are associated problems with it though, like blooms ect.
 

DHyslop

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Feelers said:
Have you thought about one of the macroalgaes? (Capulera is the most common one). Grows real quick and you know that it must be pulling something out of the water. There are associated problems with it though, like blooms ect.

Caulerpa is soo 2005. I use chaetomorpha and love it. It sucks down the nitrates like Coca-Cola. Its easy to keep and trim, the snails and pods love it, and none of the reproductive issues to worry about.

Dan
 
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