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Best substrate/sediment for bimaculoides

coralite

Hatchling
Registered
Joined
Mar 12, 2005
Messages
1
I would like to know a little more about the habitat of bimaculoides, most specifically about the type of substrates they prefer. Can anyone comment on using fine sand or crushed coral over a rubble or bare bottom?
Any input will be appreciated.
 


Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2002
Messages
5,810
Hi and welcome to TONMO.com :welcome:

Bimacs live off the coast of Californa (from mid-coast down through Baja California in Mixico. They live in mud and sand and sometimes on rocky reefs.

Most people keep them on a shallow sand bed, being careful not to use sand that has sharp edges. I researched this a couple of months ago and posted in this forum. This is what I wrote:

I spent some time on the phone with the Carib Sea people about this question(which substrate).

They make a very fine sand Aragamax that's almost like mud. There is one with slightly larger grain size caled Aragamax select. Both are considered "sugar sized" with a grain diameter of 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Neither would have sharp edges and are recommended for sharks and rays. Another slighly larger size grain in offered in the Special Grade Reef sand (1.25 -1.95mm )

The live sand costs more, but even if you don't need live sand, it can be an advantage because you don't have to wash it for an hour. They offer Bahamas Oolite, Fiji Pink, and Special Grade Reef sand - these don't have sharp edges.

Colin has a good suggestion about mixing the grades. I'm going to mix Fiji Pink with the Special Grade Reef Sand.

Nancy
 
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