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What about infection in Octopus vulgaris?

marla

Pygmy Octopus
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Feb 20, 2008
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Hi!
I'm new in this forum.
I've a problem with my octopus that present a sort of cutaneus wound on the head and between eyes.
The parameters of my aquarius are correct for the life of the octopus and there aren't things that could damage it.
so what could be?
which are the most common infections for the octopus vulgaris?
I send 2 images of the lesions.
Thank you!

(sorry for my english)
 

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monty

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:welcome: to you and your octopus!

It looks like the lesions that we see frequently in cuttlefish, when they rub up against the glass of the tank walls (often called "butt burn") although it could probably be some sort of skin infection as well... I'm not sure we've ever seen that sort of thing in octos, at least not that I can remember. A lot of the pro aquarists and researchers have seen a wider variety of ceph conditions and are likely to be able to shed more light on this, though...
 

gjbarord

Sepia elegans
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How long have you had this specimen?

From my experience, those type of lesions begin to manifest themselves during senescence and could be a sign the the octopus is nearing death. Although, it could also be a senescent type symptom brought about by stressors on the animal. That is why it is crucial to know the age of the octopus. If it is old, any type of treatment would be in vain.

Greg
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
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If it's an older animal it could be the first signs of old age and there is little you can do. If it's a newly acquired animal it could be scar tissue from some wound. We've had octopus come in with marks like that and they'd survived just fine it seems that re-grown skin does not produce chromatophores.

Octopus seem to be surprisingly resistant to infections.

J
 

monty

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Jean;111094 said:
We've had octopus come in with marks like that and they'd survived just fine it seems that re-grown skin does not produce chromatophores.
Just because I'm curious, did you check under a microscope if the chromatophres were absent, or just not "wired" to the brain's chromatophore lobes?

I'm rather curious about the implications of one or the other for tissue regeneration, since I've wondered for quite a while how a regrown arm manages to connect up to the nervous system. Chromatophores seem to be added as the animal grows, and somehow continue to be connected to the brain in such a way that it can map to the visual system and such... I wonder if that growth happens in a way that re-growth over a lesion can't recreate the developmental conditions that got it right the first time... or if the chromatophores come from a different tissue type somehow or something like that...?
 
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I would think the tissue that grows over the lesion is scar tissue,and the new arm is not tissue but a brand new appendage.So the scar tissue would not connect to the nervous system but the new appendge would.A completely uneducated statement so please correct me.
 

marla

Pygmy Octopus
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Feb 20, 2008
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not so old

gjbarord;111074 said:
How long have you had this specimen?

From my experience, those type of lesions begin to manifest themselves during senescence and could be a sign the the octopus is nearing death. Although, it could also be a senescent type symptom brought about by stressors on the animal. That is why it is crucial to know the age of the octopus. If it is old, any type of treatment would be in vain.

Greg
The octopus is about 9 months old..that I think is not so old..also because the lesions starts about 3 months ago.
So what about skin parassite?:cry:
 

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