• Welcome to TONMO, the premier cephalopod interest community. Founded in 2000, we have built a large community of experts, hobbyists and enthusiasts, some of whom come together when we host our biennial conference. To join in on the fun, sign up - it's free! You can also become a Supporter for just $50/year to remove all ads and gain access to our Supporters forum. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for more cephy goodness.

Unknown Octopus

oscar

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
Joined
Apr 18, 2004
Messages
383
I live in Brisbane, Australia

Walking along a pier one night i spotted an octopus swimming across a lit patch of water, it was small with long legs and little or no webbing (east coast of australia) dark in color - but i wasn't close enough to give a better description. What kind of octopus could this be and is it suitable for a home aquarium

I am looking at the option of collecting my own octopus/cuttlefish (preffering a cuttlefish) could you link me to a site or provide me with information on catching these great cephalopods! (time, methods, transportation, gear, handling etc.)

thanks very much, :notworth:

sam
 

Steve O'Shea

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
4,671
Hi Sam. It would be dangerous to attempt an identification based on the characters you've described for the octopus. Unless you have a photo handy I'd just stick with 'Octopus sp.'. Most (but not all) species of Octopus have a reasonably well-developed web.

There are series of papers by a chap called Warren Rathjen (I think that's the correct spelling) on cephalopod capture techniques. I'll check the details out later at work and post online.

When it comes to a coastal octopus like that you've described, capture basically entails jumping into the water and grabbing it, or putting a dipnet off the jetty and scooping it up. Nothing sophisticated in this.
Steve
 

oscar

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
Joined
Apr 18, 2004
Messages
383
thanks that helps!! ive written down the guys name but posting it would be fantastic!!

i was mainly concerned with cuttlefish but i dont think it was a blue ring anyway - its legs were much longer and it was very dark brown - i guess there isnt much u can do about id ing it

but thanks anyway!!
 

Steve O'Shea

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
4,671
myopsida said:
When it comes to a coastal octopus like that you've described, capture basically entails jumping into the water and grabbing it
really good method if its a blue ring octopus......
These are best caught with your teeth, whilst skinny dipping
 

Steve O'Shea

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
4,671
The paper was indeed by Warren Rathjen, but I'm afraid the copy that I have here is missing the most important information - that is the journal from which it came.

What I have is:
Rathjen, W.F. 1984. Squid fishing techniques. Published by 'Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries Development Foundation, Inc.', 16pp.

It's an excellent overview of the different types of trap, net, jig and lights that are used to capture squid (to which dredges, sleds, pots and hand could be added for octopus).

Rathjen put out series of papers on this sort of thing, so a search on his name might be a productive thing to do.
 
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
476
Good question. I saw on TV once a clip video about a small little octopus with very, very long arms and little to NO webbing.
I think it's called the "Long armed octopus" or something like that.
They said many of it's arms or peices could sometimes be found broken off in the waters of the oceans.
I think the clip was on "Incredible Suckers" or something else.
Probably Incredible Suckers if im not mistaken.
But I know exactly what type of octopus your talking about cause it fitted the description perfectly.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
20,843
Messages
206,718
Members
8,457
Latest member
DaneMom6800

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV (2011): Terri
TONMOCON V (2013): Jean
TONMOCON VI (2015): Taollan
TONMOCON VII (2018): ekocak


Top