shakeup for the tree of life

Jean

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I have the the Young Vecchione & Donovan one, I bought that issue. I'll try to find the volume and pdf you a copy.

The former in your last post is on it's way!

J
 

monty

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Jean;117531 said:
I have the the Young Vecchione & Donovan one, I bought that issue. I'll try to find the volume and pdf you a copy.

The former in your last post is on it's way!

J

Cool! Thanks!
 
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Well, after reading the links - and have to admit, I like the idea of "No predators and lost of sex" part - I have to say this sounds interesting.

I wish I could get institutionalized so I could get a copy of this paper. :tongue:

Well, the Onycophora (Velvet Worms) as a sister group to the Arthropods is kinda old news. From what I know Ecdysis is a pretty much straightforward hormal process (even then its an AWESOME evolutionary process to study), and many phyla share this trait. I'm glad they are no longer trying to sell the coelom as the end-all of evolutionary traits, because while body cavities are a novel concept, there's a bit of evidence that covergence tends to play a role here.

Hmm... The Sipuncula and Echiura... trochophore larva and all... Well, I am all for Mollusca and Annelida having a common ancestry.

I worry, though, about the treatment of molecular phylogeny as the holy grail of classification. Somehow, I get the impression that rates of mutation are treated as constant, and that seems a little too Schroedinger's Cat for me to be completely at ease.

Oh well, good show. I need to find a copy of that paper...

- John

Oh, and Velvet Worms are awesome. Their mode of attack is just sweet. Check out "Life in the Undergrowth" from BBC. David Attenborough is my master, I am his padawan.
 

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