Neurological Question

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Jan 31, 2004
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amazing really amazing but do they have the ability to copy? Beacuse on the discovery channel they say that only humans and great apes learn from copying or something along those lines . eh sorry to ask are you just very bright or are you in the medical/marine biology feild id love to know :madsci:
 

um...

Architeuthis
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I think I read in Cephalopod Behaviour that they apparently can't learn like that. I wouldn't be shocked either way.
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
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I've heardd of and seen octis learning by observation, what one octi was taught another watching also learned.............that's a form of copying yes?

J
 
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mcatee123 said:
amazing really amazing but do they have the ability to copy? Beacuse on the discovery channel they say that only humans and great apes learn from copying or something along those lines . eh sorry to ask are you just very bright or are you in the medical/marine biology feild id love to know :madsci:

mcatee,

No, I would have to say that copying is a learning process that exists in other animals as well. A lot of this is covered in Wilson's Sociobiology, but you also see evidence of mimicry in dolphins, and possibly in cephalopods as well.

Are you asking if I'm in the medical or marine biological field or did you pose the question to brown?

Have a great day!

John
 
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Jan 31, 2004
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write mate ive got it its "cephalopod neurobiology:neuroscience studies in squid,octopusand cuttlefish," by N.J Abbot its damn good fujisawas sake!!! if you are speacilizing in cephs like my brother and father runs in the family! it is a must have


samuel mcatee :grad:
 
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So here's my attempt to George Romero this topic, mostly since neurology and behavior has recenly been discussed on other threads....

Brown said:
So for example, in your CNS there is a representitive physical map of your sensory fields. This helps you to 'know' where you arm is positioned is space with your eyes shut. This does not seem to be the case for Octopus. For example from the recent the work of Hochner+ co on arm control it seems that the arm is 'cast ' (like a fly fisherman) towards an object and there seems to be no cns control other than a go signal. More work required though before a firm conclusion can be reached...

So this is about proprioception, right? But isn't human movement not always completely regulated as well? I find it hard to believe that octos wouldn't have better control over their arms. It just doesn't seem to jive with selection; if you have eight arms, some not always in your feild of view, you would have to know where they were in three-dimensional space or risk losing them. Maybe their proprioception is percieved differenly?

Can anyone send me info on where I can find Hochner's paper?

John
 

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