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Need some help Please...New to all of this.

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Nov 22, 2015
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HI, I'm new to this forum, as well as owning an octopus. I have been gifted 1 (which I have not received yet...but any day now it should be here). At first the thought was interesting and I got a bit excited. However, I am 1 of those people that have to research endlessly before doing anything. Needless to say that after some reading I now have a lot of anxiety over this.

All I know is that this is the 1 that's on its way to me (Baby Florida Octopus CHANGE COLOR). I finally found out whom it was purchased from and was able to get a little info. I was told that it gets no larger than 12 inches and that I would be getting a female that would stay a bit smaller.

I do have a 65 gallon reef tank that been going for a few years now. But, I have quickly decided it can't go in there long term. I need to know what size tank would be best so I start quick cycling it with my established tank media.

Thank you for reading my little book of nerves LOL (if this is in the wrong place please feel free to move it)
 

tonmo

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Thanks - do you have a photo to share? Our experts could help identify your octo.
 
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s-l1600.jpg

this is what it looks like now
 

tonmo

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Before I go further - you should know I'm not an expert. I'm sure you'll get some help here though soon enough.

That said, cycling a tank with an octopus on the way does not seem to be a practical solution. I don't believe I'm overstating it when I say a tank should cycle for months before adding an octo... based on what I've read.

Why is the 65 gallon tank not sufficient? Are there other problematic inhabitants?
 
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Yes. Not only my corals but, anemone, mated clown fish, leopard wrasse, scooter blennie and maxima clam. As well as a few other fish and flame clams.
 
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I do have an established tank that I have set up in case of emergencies. But it's only 30 gallons I wasnt sure if that would be large enough to house the octo. long term. However, she could stay in there until I get another up going and cycled. I know how long cycling takes.......forever lol.
 

tonmo

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Got it... I imagine 30 would work for a while... Let's see what @DWhatley and any other resident keepers have to say. Hang in there! :smile:
 

DWhatley

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There is a collection of discussions linked in the Octopus Care sticky titled Posts with Info for New Octopus Keepers that I always recommend when first starting out.

If the information is accurate, this should be O. mercatoris, a dwarf species (it is possible to raise these at home but I am unaware of anyone doing this commercially). We typically measure an octopus by its mantle and arm lengths. Adult mantle length (from behind the eyes to the tip of the mantle) will typically not exceed 1.5" and each arm about 4" so 9-10" diameter with arms spread.

The 30 will work fine for long term housing (roughly 10 months from the current size). You will want to octo-proof the top and be sure that there are plenty of hiding places. For a merc, the best den I have found is a set of giant purple barnacles (often available on eBay - most are not varnished and varnish should not be used) wedged into live rock placed in the lower 1/3 of the aquarium (preferably close to the center of the tank to discourage escape).

You will need to address octo-proofing quickly. The two most important aspects require a top with no escape holes and protection around any water movement hardware impellers. Since this one is very small, I recommend placing a media bag around any water intake even if there is a tube and slotted filter. I find this style to be particularly useful and easiest to clean with holes small enough to keep arms and animals out of harms way but big enough to allow water movement. The zipper allows for easy snugging and removal. Avoid the drawstring type as once the string is wet, they are a royal pain to open and close but you may need to start with one if you have to order a zippered alternative. Mercs are not very strong so weighting down the top is less critical than with other animals BUT they do find any openings (especially if they are in dark places). Block any cuts in the top. Course sponges work fairly well for this. If it is an all in one, placing a light in the back chamber is very effective for making that nice dark area far less desirable.
 
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Nov 22, 2015
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Oh my goodness!! Thank you so very very much. I have been scared to death that I was going to get something that would end up being gargantuan in size. What a huge relief :sun:. So a 30 will be a good forever home (that's no issue). And I have been searching, reading and brainstorming on how to "lock" her in. At least now I can relax. I will get the barnacles and I already have the mesh bags on hand. YaY now I can just relax and enjoy.:police:
 

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