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Any octo or cuttle suitable for a 29 gallon?

Joined
Aug 9, 2006
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I have been planning on a Bimac for some time, but after finding out that my 75 gallon tank was once treated with a copper based anti-ick medicine, the 75 gallon tank is not suitable for any inverts. I Think I will make it a FOWLR instead.

I have a brand new 29 gallon tank sitting in a box. This tank was once filled with tap water just to see if they were any leaks in it. Is it still suitable for a octo or cuttle after being touched by tap water? (I am a newb to SW so expect dumb questions like this :wink: )

More importantly, what (if any) species of octo or cuttle fish will live comfortably in a 29 gallon tank?
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Dec 22, 2004
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There are dwarf species that will be happy in a 29. The problem is dwarf octos are hard to identify: someone might sell you a "dwarf" that grows to be pretty big!

You could probably keep a dwarf cuttlefish, but it might appreciate a bit more room.

If you're worried about your 75, perhaps you could sell it and buy a different used 75, one that hopefully has not been treated with copper?

Dan
 

monty

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I normally let the experienced tank keepers speak up on this, but I feel obligated to point out:

55 gallons is the recommended minimum size for the octopus species most commonly kept by Tonmoers, Bimacs and Briareus. I'm not sure what the minimum tank size is for aculeatus, which has also become available recently.

30/29 gallons are generally considered acceptable for dwarf octo species and bandensis cuttlefish. There are a number of liabilities of dwarf octos, in particular that they tend to be short-lived and noctournal, but some people get quite attached to them anyway.

There are no absolutes, but as a general rule, smaller tanks tend to be more problematic for cephs in general because the smaller volume of water means that if something goes wrong, it can very quickly get to the point where it is dangerous or fatal to your pet. These issues can be addressed in a number of ways, including extra filtration, having a sump for extra water volume, and keeping extra pre-mixed water on hand for emergency water changes. Frequent testing of water quality is more important the smaller the volume of water, as well... the "Setting up for S. bandensis" section if Thales's(formerly Righty's) article is a good place to start for the kind of setup for keeping a small ceph in a small tank.

I don't want to be too harsh, but aximbigfan's comment

29g is wayyy to small to even thinkbout puttig a ceph in. i would say that 100g is the absulute min.
is completely wrong. Please try not to give information out that you're not certain of without checking it first.
 

monty

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kingsnar;77506 said:
What species are dwarf octopuses?
There are a number of them-- Joubini and Rubescens are the ones I can think of, but I think Rubescens need a chiller (they also have a reputation for biting a lot, but they're Roy Caldwell's favorite octopus. The smaller blue-ringed species are also considered dwarfs, but their bite is extremely lethal, so most folks around here don't recommend them as pets. I'm sure there are several more species of dwarf/pygmy octos people have kept, but I can't think of them just now... Sellers also frequently mis-identify them, too.
 

jc45

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Dec 4, 2005
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monty;77508 said:
There are a number of them-- Joubini and Rubescens are the ones I can think of,
Are you sure O. rubescens is a dwarf species? I was under the impression that they grew to about the size of a bimac.

Other dwarf species are O. bocki, O. fitchi and O. digueti, but I don't know if they're that available in the pet trade...

Joey
 
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Sep 16, 2005
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Well... I guess I should chime in here, since I have a 29 gallon and three Sepia bandensis. I have a lot of live rock, a HOB filter, a protein skimmer and I do water changes twice a week. I also have a cycled 55 gallon for when they get too big for the 29 gallon. My cuttles are about 3 months old and will probably move in another month or so. Oh, and I have about 15+ years of keeping salt water tanks. So, it is possible... check out the tank owners database, it will give you some more ideas.
 

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