Squid Body From Whale Stomach

OB

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Reviving this thread, assuming the jury is still out....

Back to Clem's query by mademoiselle Ocean (are you for real?).

Could it be that the parts identified as "mantle" and "tailfins" are merely non-dislocated tentacles, given the the assumed gladius a much more logical position? I would say that looking at the "mantle" as a tentacle slumped anti-clockwise and the "tail" section as either one tentacle in a loop or two tentacles loosely associated towards the back would provide an easier way of identifying this unfortunate sperm whale victim? Let me go back and count as well and see whether I get to 8 or 10 this way

PS: "I took a few pictures"; wazzup wi' dat? Could you give Joan a buzz?
 

Clem

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ob said:
Could it be that the parts identified as "mantle" and "tailfins" are merely non-dislocated tentacles, given the the assumed gladus a much more logical position?
Hello OB,

Good question. Granting that rl] is less than optimal in terms of detail and scale, I still think that the head of the squid is in the foreground of the picture plane, arm-stumps and all, with the tail in the background. Your argument that the gladius should, by rights, be closer to the tail is certainly logical. Given that this squid was run over by the cetacean equivalent of a double-decker bus, I still think it's more likely that the gladius was violently compressed, possibly snapped in two (or three) and squeezed out through the mantle margin.(I should also say that the remains in the photo could well have been given a post-mortem working over by sharks or other predators, so I shouldn't go blaming the whale for all of the damage.)

Unfortunately I have not heard from Ms. Ocean since our initial exchange, so haven't got any more pics or testimony to share.

Cheers,
Clem
 

OB

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Total agreement here on orientation, I guess that we're looking straight into the buccal mass. I'll do some work on the picture as to illustrate my "hypothesis"

Edit: Please find loose rendition, giving you the general idea of my argument :biggrin2:
 

Clem

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Hello OB,

While you're working on your illo, here are a few more whale crumbs to ponder.

This one doesn't have much info attached (none, really), but it does provide an interesting view of the internal structures of the severed arms.

And then there are these two, photographed in the Azores. The one on the left looks like Haliphron atlanticus to me.

Cheers,
Clem
 

OB

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WRT the latter: could well be Hali (we seem to be cultivating funky abbrev's around here)
 

Phil

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Clem said:
(I should also say that the remains in the photo could well have been given a post-mortem working over by sharks or other predators, so I shouldn't go blaming the whale for all of the damage.)

Indeed. However, I would like to add that I doubt that the corpse had been scavenged by other predators to any large extent as the skin looks fairly intact without obvious damage scars other than the stumps. I suppose if it had been nibbled by fish to any extent the skin would be much more broken up than it appears from these photos.

It maintains its blood-red colour throughout with no obvious scarring or flakes of skin peeling off. The severing of the torso looks fairly clean cut to me and I doubt if it had been in the water very long.
 

OB

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Clem said:
Hello OB,

While you're working on your illo, here are a few more whale crumbs to ponder.

Does anyone have any comments? I'm reposting, just in case my earlier edit got overlooked :biggrin2:
 

Clem

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Hello Olaf,

I still think the spatulate form at the top is the tail, and not an arm/tentacle curled in upon itself; the void at the center looks like a ragged puncture wound to me.

Of course, I'm just guessing about it all, too.

Cheers,
Clem
 

Steve O'Shea

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Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. Interesting developments; I'm now inclined to believe that this is a dismembered Haliphron, rather than some weird short-mantled squid (contradicting what I said way back in the dark ages).

I've added a plate from an earlier paper we did; unfortunately the images are in black & white (colours are out there, but I cannot find anything on this computer any longer). The thing is basically a poorly differentiated head/mantle and long arms. What you could have in your floating blob is an intact arm, coiling around at the rear of the mantle, looking like a fin.

That was indeed a tricky one. I'm not saying the jury is out, but it is more likely than a mystery squid with a very short mantle and funny fin.
 

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Steve O'Shea

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........ummmmmmmmmmm. Thanks Kevin. I 'kind-of' edited that photo in the final publication ........ (as in cut myself out of it)
 

OB

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Steve O'Shea said:
What you could have in your floating blob is an intact arm, coiling around at the rear of the mantle, looking like a fin.

That was indeed a tricky one. I'm not saying the jury is out, but it is more likely than a mystery squid with a very short mantle and funny fin.

I'm glad at least SOMEONE agrees with me :smile:

One thing though; if it's indeed an octopus, then what is the almost sepia like gladius doing there? If it's a (partly extruded) gladius at all to start with?
 

Steve O'Shea

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I'd say that the 'gladius' that you've labelled is actually the ripped open funnel (it's in the right place), or some severed arms viewed in a peculiar fashion; that gladius on a fresh specimen like this, if that's what it was, would be completely transluscent - you'd be very lucky to see it.

I can't say for sure that this is octopod, or that the coiled thing out the back is a fin or an arm, but I certainly lean towards the octopus theory rather than squid right now. The photograph isn't exactly the most helpful ... it's a teaser!
 
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