RESEARCH IN NEW ZEALAND (23 April 2003)

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What is it with the rest of the world and our animals?
Tell me about it! I think a lot of tourists come here and expect to see Koalas in every tree and roos bounding across urban pedestrian crossings (not to mention spiders under every toilet seat :shock: ). Its not quite like that, although in the outback locals try avoid driving at dawn and dusk as collisions with roos are extremely common. A mature roo can do huge damage to a vehicle not to mention killing the animal, which is much more sad. :frown:

I can't say I've had that many male roos flash their bits at me (maybe they find you more appealing, Krin :lol:) but I once witnessed a mating fight by a couple of mature reds. That was pretty awesome, not to mention scary. Don't forget, we also have deadly fish, jellyfish, and most importantly octopus.

Despite all this hideous danger constantly surrounding us, most of us manage to live pretty ordinary lives. After all, spiders, snakes and marsupials don't carry handguns. :jester:
 


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You DO have some awfully dangerous critters out there...

Interestingly, your roo+car=Bad Things problem is quite common here too, only with deer. Habitat encroachment/elimination and all that...

rusty
 

WhiteKiboko

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Tentacular! said:
A mature roo can do huge damage to a vehicle not to mention killing the animal, which is much more sad. :frown:

interesting.... of all the people i know that've had deer/car collisions, i think the deer has ran away everytime....even after totaling some of the cars.... :bonk:

i guess they have a lower center of gravity, so they dont go up and over the hood.... kinda like the child/adult/car/SUV thing.....
 
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WhiteKiboko said:
interesting.... of all the people i know that've had deer/car collisions, i think the deer has ran away everytime....even after totaling some of the cars.... :bonk:

i guess they have a lower center of gravity, so they dont go up and over the hood.... kinda like the child/adult/car/SUV thing.....

I've worked at a wildlife rescue/rehabilitation place before and I've discovered that deer often run away from a totaled car, but they usually die soon afterwards, depending on their injuries.
 

WhiteKiboko

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considering the forces involved, that doesnt surprise me... but the ability to get up from such an impact is still quite impressive
 


Steve O'Shea

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fluffysquid said:
Steve-

So..... what's this about undergrad degrees in Marine Biology there in NZ? Just out of curiosity, really.

thanks,
Amber

There's some interesting stuff happening here in NZ, Amber, if you're interested in squid, octopus, systematics, culture/aquaculture, general deep-sea biology and marine invertebrates in general - and we can even throw in a little documentary work if you're so inclined (we're juggling 4 at this point in time ... as in the next couple of months). You should see some interesting squid stuff start hitting the screens early next year .... and beyond.
 

Steve O'Shea

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Architeuthiscrazy said:
Dr. O'Shea,

I'd love to look through the contents of the Kogia stomachs, probably just a little greenhorn giddiness (is that even a word?) but I doubt you'd be able to keep them for another four years. I will be starting my first year of college in September. Would you be able to give some advice on the direction ceph research is headed. Meaning would it be better to pursue knowledge of genetics or behavior. I think Dr. Roland Anderson has me going for behavior but I'm looking for another opinion. Especially as I would like to work along side you. I'll stop with the brown nosing now.

Michael :meso:

Michael, this will be an ongoing project (the Kogia/Physeter stomach content analysis), but the work needn't be restricted to New Zealand surveys/stomach-content analysis. Fiheries impacts are occurring on a global scale, and as such the diet of these toothed whales is likely to change, or forced to change throughout their entire recognised distributions.

Ceph research could head in any direction. You just have to determine what you want to do - whether it be biology/life history, behaviour, systematics, culture or conservation (and more). Just ask Tintenfisch what it's like working alongside me ..... you might have second thoughts you know.
Cheers
O
 

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