[Non-Ceph] CONGRATULATIONS TO ANDY!!! New (old) species discovery!

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No flies on Andy !:biggrin2: & I'd love to see Carboniferous fly-paper.
Have I bored you all with the tale of my failed attempt to get my name in neon lights at the NHM off the back of a weevil ? It's really really interesting :lol: not !

Keef
 

neuropteris

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Thanks very much everybody - I didn't expect it to create such a stir! My contribution is actually fairly limited - I wouldn't know a Palaeoydictyopteran from a blue bottle normally (though this was obviously not a blue bottle).

As regards the name I had no input - though I think its a very good name, thats all down to Ru and Andre though.

This year Anglopterum - next year a complete Meganeura?

Whats this about the weevil Keef?

Andy
 

Phil

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Andy, have you got hold of Evolution of the Insects by Cambridge University Press? If not, you really should. It's an absolutely stunning work and was published last year; it contains half a dozen pages on the palaeodictyoperida and some stunning colour and b/w photos. Best of all, it is technical, but not too technical, if you catch my drift.

Keef - please tell us again about the weevil. I am still smarting about the rise and fall of my coal millipede. Let's keep trying, eh?
 

Phil

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From the aforementioned book, here are a few snippets about Palaeodictyopterida (whew!) to help put Andy's discovery into context.

Palaeodictyopterida were an extinct superorder of insects and were the dominant insects in the Paleozoic comprising about 50% of all known species. The earliest fossils we have of this group date to the mid Carboniferous (320m) but after radiating into a diversity of specialised forms they all disappeared at the end of the Permian (247m). They were one of the very earliest insects to take flight following the rise of forests in the Devonian.

They are characterised by having two lobes resembling flight small flight wings on the front of the thorax forward of the proper wings and located behind the head. These were not articulated as fully functional wings though on a superficial glance, one may be mistaken in thinking that they were six winged insects.

Most species of these insects had a long beak which they used for puncturing plant tissues and sucking plant materials, this was in form and function much akin to the Hemiptera (true bugs, aphids, cicadas). They also had long segmented appendages in the tail (cerci) and long antennae. Unlike the Odonata (dragonflies) the nymphs of the Palaeodictyopterida were believed to have been terrestrial which indicates that the two groups must have developed independantly.

These insects were probably brightly coloured and would have been spectacular in appearance; striking wing patterns have been observed in some amazingly preserved Early Permian specimens from Kansas. These colours and patterns could have been used to confuse predators. In size some forms were enormous, Mazothairos reached a wingspan of 550mm (22 inches), second only to the very largest Protodonata (primitive dragonflies). Any stroll though a late Carboniferous forest would have been an explosive aerial riot of these amazing herbivorous insects, mayflies and predatory dragonflies; flashing colours and dancing forms.
 

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okay seeing as you asked.....
it all started when the Flaming Katy (kalanchoë blossfeldiana ) on the kitchen windowsill mysteriously died. When I postmortemed the pot it was full of weevil grubs. I then became more conscious of weevils & their attempts to sneak into the house where my treasured coconuts, smuggled into the UK from the Maldives , were thriving in the sun lounge. No pests were crossing my threshold.

Not long after this period of heightened security, there was an article in the Yahoo science section :roll: about a bod from the NHM Entomology Dept. who'd discovered a rare Armadillo weevil (Otiorhynchus armadillo) in a shop window on his way to work. There was a piccy too & it was a dead ringer for the perps chez moi.

I emailed Max Bugman (strange how experts have names to suit their calling in life, according to Richard Fortey there was a worm expert at the NHM called Wrigley & Mr Fortey's predecessor was Dr. Phacops McPhee. A fisheries conservation officer was on the news last week called Mr. Pickerel :lol: ) to tell him I may have his beasties in me garden & he was more than excited as this would be the most northerly population of Otiorhynchus armadillo ever & he asked if I could furnish him a specimen (of weevil).
How could I refuse, fame & fortune beckoned but not a single, solitary weevil showed it's face until the following summer. When I finally captured a victim I emailed Max & told him of the imminent arrival of weevil 'A' secured in a 35mm film pot, you could tell that he was salivating like Uncle Steve O'Shea wielding his cut-throat by a sperm whale.
The days passed & eventually a judgement arrived in my Inbox, weevil 'A' was just a common vine weevil. I've never got over it & had to leave the country !:oops:

what happened to your millipede then Phileas ? was it a stick ?

Keef
 

OB

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That is just......









SOOOOOOO COOOOOOOL!!!!!

Once more I am humbled by the wonderful people here at TONMO. This is really good :smile:

When it comes to outerworldliness, arthropods may even have a thing or two on ceophalopods, but without the added benefit of intelligence...
 
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Sorry Phil :lol: :lol: :lol: ? I just checked back through "Non Ceph" about your millipede & it was a stick !

Mind you I found a bit of a Cretaceous marine reptile which turned out to be a sponge ! :oops:
 

neuropteris

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That was a weevily good story Keef (weevily good..really good - geddit?). I like weevils, one of the few insects that don't give me the heebie jeebies when I find one crawling up my jumper.
 
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