Family Tree of Cephalopods


Cephalopod through the ages

By Phil Eyden

May 2018 edit - also see this update from @Danna reflecting research through 2017!

65630
Original publish date
Mar 19, 2004
About the Author
Phil
Phil joined the TONMO.com staff in April 2003. He collects fossils as a hobby, frequently plundering a quarry at Folkestone in the U.K. He has a degree in British archaeology and works for a government department at Dover in England.

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By Phil Eyden Note: Phil welcomes discussion on this article in the Fossils and History forum on the Message Board. Introduction Folkestone is located at the extreme southeast tip of England. It is a port-town with a small harbour and is roughly about 30 miles away from France. Folkestone...
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History has regarded cephalopod fossils in interesting ways... By Phil Eyden, 2004 INTRODUCTION Before the mid eighteenth century the origin of fossils was generally regarded in terms of superstition and myth. Many differing accounts across different cultures explained how these fossils...
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By Andy Tenny (neuropteris) The Yorkshire Coast of England exposes a series of marine and terrestrial rocks ranging in age from the lower Jurassic at Cleveland in the north through to the chalk of the Upper Cretaceous at Flamborough Head in the South. Many of these formations are highly...
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