SQUIDCAM 2: Fossil Cephcam

Phil

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Latest shot from the tank for you all. Growing nicely, it seems.

Ammoncam.PNG
 

cthulhu77

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:notworth: very, very, very clever my friend...applause is not enough...you should get a medal of some sort...perhaps at Tonmocon?
Once again, :notworth:
 

Phil

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Hey! These are real you know, not dubious paintshop hoaxes! I'm all offended now....

Anyway, we have further interesting developments over in our Nautiloid tank with our six rapidly growing orthocones. Hopefully we should be able to release them into the wild in a couple of weeks.

Nautiloidcam.PNG
 

cthulhu77

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Beware, bathers of south England !!! What was that old saw about by HG Wells...with the cephs?
 

cthulhu77

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You pegged it...escaped my 5 a.m. mind there for a bit...what a wonderful short story that was...
 

Phil

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Yeah, good idea Carol. Alternatively, how about "101 Things I Didn't Expect to Find With Squidcam?"
 

Steve O'Shea

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... well it got me thinking ... comparing the squidcam versions. Has anyone a photo of a Nautilus egg that they could post online? Has anyone described/reported anything like this in the fossil record? Surely if cephalopod soft parts can (albeit rarely) fossilize, surely an egg with an outer, hardened egg capsule could fossilize also.

Anyone want to hazard a guess whether ammonites and nautiloids deposited few large eggs to the seabed, brooded their young, or did as most squid do, that is release eggs freely into the water column, singly or in large gelatinous structures, or attach them to the seabed, singly or in gelatinous strings.

Remains of cirrate (finned octopods) eggs litter the deep sea in places around New Zealand, depths > 2500m, as do squid beaks.
 
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