Research paper troubles......need a little help

stits

Blue Ring
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Feb 3, 2003
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The university of Hawaii's library (and journal research system) sadly leaves a lot to be desired. I'm writing a research paper titled 'Cephalpod Neurology: An Evolutionary Overview'. It first just goes over basic Chep brain structior and then reviews each progressive ceph order. I'm having a lot of trouble find journal reffrences for this. Almost everything I've been able to find isn't even on Campus or if it is it's from the 1970s or earlyer.........OMG. I know there has been a ton research in this arena in just the past decade. Can anyone here maybe point me in the right direction. Perhaps a really good Journal article from which I can get a start and request a ton of interlibary loans. I'll make thouse libraians work for thier money.



Muhahahahahahahahah :wink:
 
I can't find my copy right now to look at the references, but John Allman's book "Evolving Brains" has a section on cephs. I audited his class on comparative nervous systems, and we spent a week or so on cephs... The book's been around for a few years, so it's probably not the latest and greatest, but it might provide a good overview and source for references to search.

Amazon.com

You could also try cephbase. I expect the Hanlon and Messenger "Cephalopod Behavior" book might be a good place to start, too, but I don't have that one yet...

Maybe doing a literature search for papers that reference JZ Young would help, he did a lot of the work in ceph neuroanatomy, although he's also quite prolific in other neurobiology topics, so you'd have to narrow the results a lot, I expect.

I also got a lot of results just typing "cephalopod brain evolution" at Google Scholar

there are some refs here; I assume your libarary will at least have Nature from 2003: Cephalopod Hox genes and the origin of morphological novelties - Nature
 
monty said:
I can't find my copy right now to look at the references, but John Allman's book "Evolving Brains" has a section on cephs. I audited his class on comparative nervous systems, and we spent a week or so on cephs... The book's been around for a few years, so it's probably not the latest and greatest, but it might provide a good overview and source for references to search.

Evolving Brains: Allman, John: 9780716760382: Amazon.com: Books

You could also try cephbase. I expect the Hanlon and Messenger "Cephalopod Behavior" book might be a good place to start, too, but I don't have that one yet...

Maybe doing a literature search for papers that reference JZ Young would help, he did a lot of the work in ceph neuroanatomy, although he's also quite prolific in other neurobiology topics, so you'd have to narrow the results a lot, I expect.

I also got a lot of results just typing "cephalopod brain evolution" at Google Scholar

there are some refs here; I assume your libarary will at least have Nature from 2003: Cephalopod Hox genes and the origin of morphological novelties - Nature


Thanks Man. Yeah oddly enough all I can find journal wise is stuff by J.Z. Young. But it's all so old that it doesn't look that great for a research paper. I'm gonna check out the rest though.

Thanks agian,


-Matt
 
stits said:
....Yeah oddly enough all I can find journal wise is stuff by J.Z. Young. But it's all so old that it doesn't look that great for a research paper.....
Tsk, tsk, tsk!

Some of the best work was done such a long time ago!
 
Steve O'Shea said:
Tsk, tsk, tsk!

Some of the best work was done such a long time ago!


Yeah, and every other paper I find references the guy. I'm not saying he isn't the corner stone/authority on ceph ganglions. Just that we already have several generations of research based on his.
 
Hey Stits, does your uni library have Athens ability! I set up an Athens account through my uni and am able to access a lot of online journals and search software like Scopus! http://www.athens.ac.uk/ OK so this is a UK site, but you might be able to use it.

Failing that, Google Scholar!! I also swear by this!!Google Scholar

I know all about having to find scientific papers, especially for Cephs! I, myself, joined this forum for help for stuff on my dessertation, which is based on the comparative morphology of cephalopods suckers, and now I can't get away from this place!:wink:

The guys here are great, and are always willing to help out with any questions! Your subject sounds pretty cool, I hope you have a better time finding papers than I have!:biggrin2:

Good luck, man!

Graeme
 
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