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Octopus

Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
540
Here's a fine little octopus from the Lebanese Cretaceous, roughly 5 cm across (armspan). Mouth, ink sack and other internal features are visible, but I can't make out stylets or gladius yet. I'll make some close-up images later.
 

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DWhatley

Kraken
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How would you determine and octopus fossile from a squid fossil since we have some today that are iffy?
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
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That is SOOOO cool, I have never seen one of those before....Finally a fossil that I can tell what I'm looking at!
 

Terri

Sepia elegans
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Dec 20, 2009
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961
Wow! Am I correct in saying that there are very, very few of these fossils found to date...maybe a dozen or so?
 
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
540
D, each of the other coleoids in this fauna has a distinctive elongate gladius (e.g. Glyphiteuthis, Rachiteuthis, Boreopeltis, Dorateuthis). The octopods have either a pair of vestigial gladius plates (Keuppia, Palaeoctopus) or a pair of tiny stylets (Styletoctopus). Then there's the shape!

Kevin, in the lower image I've drawn over the photo in powerpoint and set the transparency of the shape to 90%. This is how I made these drawings too.

Capt. and Sk, I also find it very easy to imagine this one alive!

Terri, true, not many of these have been found.

I've just taken a few close-ups (attached). The soft parts show beautifully in UV light, but I haven't worked out how to make a good photo of this yet.
 

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DWhatley

Kraken
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Do you or Kevin take a portable UV when you go hunting (especially Kevin since he camps)? I am assuming the soft body parts "glow" like white using the ultra violet and would think Terri might find something interesting on a night hunt with one.

The shape is what made me wonder (not the arms, they certainly look cephy but oddly uniform, unlike the ones we normally see in the wild that are almost always missing parts). The beak seems to be very wrongly placed for an octopusor am I looking at it incorrectly yet again by assuming the indentation is the beak area.
 

Architeuthoceras

Architeuthis
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dwhatley;165750 said:
Do you or Kevin take a portable UV when you go hunting (especially Kevin since he camps)? I am assuming the soft body parts "glow" like white using the ultra violet and would think Terri might find something interesting on a night hunt with one.

No, I don't take a UV light with me. Most of the fossils out here are replaced with calcite and most of the matrix is limestone or shale, limestone is mostly calcite and shale has a lot of calcite in it (calcite makes up about 4% of the total weight of the earth), so they would all show up the same color. At home I have seen very few of my fossils show up a bright and/or different color under UV light (unlike all the old '60s posters on my walls :sly:).
 

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