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(NON-CEPH). Please help me ID this tooth!

Phil

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Attached is a picture of a tooth I found in the 100mya clays at Folkestone in Kent (UK). I suspect it might be some form of marine reptile, though I do not think it is conical enough. Another option might be that it is from some form of marine crocodile.

It is beautifully preserved, even down to the enamel and is just over 1.5 inches long. There are no serrated edges to the tooth though it does have two slight ridges extending from the root to the tip.

Any help in identifying this tooth would be appreciated.

Cheers!
 

Phil

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Thanks very much, John.

I think you might be right about the crocodilian form. However, It could not be a thecodont because it simply is not old enough; this tooth is early Cretaceous and the thecodonts existed in the Triassic. However, if I remember rightly, the thecodonts were the ancestors of the crocodilians so, as you point out, there should be a similarity.

I'll see if I can find some pictures of crocodile and thecodont teeth to compare.

Phil
 
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Actually, maybe I'm a little rusty on the lingo (its been years since my last herp class), but I think "thecodont" also deals with the style of dentition (in this case, crocodilians). I may be wrong. I need to look it up.

You know, I totally forgot about the Thecodonts themselves... Soooo... Yeah, I should look that up.

I still think its reptilian. You said it was about 110 myo? What was the particular strata in which you found the tooth back then?

This is interesting... :biggrin2:
 
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Heya Phil...

Yeah, I looked it up... It seems thecodont dentition is a form of dentition first found in the Thecodonts themselves. Its a type of dentition where the roots of the teeth are in sockets (alveoli) in the jawbone. And yes, that's the type Crocodilians have.

I think you have a Croc tooth, but as to freshie or saltie I have no clue.

John
 

Phil

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Howdo John.

Thanks for the information as ever.

Just looked 'Thecodont' up in the Collins English dictionary. It seems that the word is indeed a noun and an adjective. Here's what it said:

thecodont

adjective
1 (of mammals and certain reptiles) having teeth that grow in sockets
2 of or relating to teeth of this type

noun
3 any extinct reptile of the order Thecodontia, of Triassic times, having teeth set in sockets: they gave rise to the dinosaurs, crocodiles, pterodactyls, and birds
[ETYMOLOGY: 20th Century: New Latin Thecondontia, from Greek theke case + -odont]


Seems you learn something every day!

Thanks again.......

The Thecodont Hunter.
 

Phil

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John,

I watched a programme featuring many shots of crocodiles last night on BBC1 (even though it was about the Loch Ness Monster, don't ask). I must admit, I was struck by similarity of crocodile teeth to my fossil, even down to the ridges. I think you are right!

I can only assume it came from a 100 million year old marine crocodile as it was found in a clay deposit containing numerous belemnites, bivalves, ammonites, crinoid stems, etc. None of those are known from freshwater deposits as far as I am aware.

Thanks again!
 
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No problem, Phil... Actually, I was remembering my herpetology classes and my internship in Florida, where the gators are large and in charge. Crocodilians (both freshies and salties) tend to have the same teeth styles. And heck, the thecodont dentition has been aorund long enough right?

:smile:

Sushi and Sake,

John
 

Architeuthoceras

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Phil,
I would say it is Mosasaur, seems to me croc teeth are straighter and more conical. Check the links below and compare some of them to your specimen. The root looks a little different but they have the same recurved shape.


Mosasaur Teeth 1
See the SOLD specimen

Mosasaur Teeth 2
at the bottom of the page

Let me know what you think. Remember, I'm not the Crocodile Hunter.

:ammonite: :nautilus: :ammonite: :nautilus:
 

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