• Welcome to TONMO, the premier cephalopod interest community, and birthplace of #WorldOctopusDay and #CephalopodAwarenessDays. Founded in 2000, we are a large community of experts, hobbyists and enthusiasts, some of whom come together when we host our biennial conference. To join in on the fun, sign up. You can also become a Supporter for just $50/year to remove all ads and enjoy other perks. Follow us on Twitter for more cephy goodness.

NEWS: Claim: Global Warming = Bigger Squid

erich orser

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
1,632
Your friend wouldn't own a lot of stock in the petrol-chemical companies, would he? :lol:
 

GPO87

Sepia elegans
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 6, 2005
Messages
836
:mrgreen: So, the first thing I read is that Canada is going to benefit! GO CANADA! :canada:

Then I got to the part about the larger squid... that's so cool, I really didn't know that squid would grow faster if the temperature increased! THATS SOOOO COOL!
 

erich orser

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
1,632
Canada will have some benefits. Unless you're a polar bear, that is. They'll probably go extinct within the next couple hundred years if the climatologists are correct.
 

Steve O'Shea

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
4,671
erich orser said:
.....They'll probably go extinct within the next couple hundred years if the climatologists are correct.

They'll probably be extinct for other reasons, before climate change has a chance to wipe them out.

Remember, an increase in temperature will have a corresponding effect on the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood (and water) (reducing it). Cold-water species will not necessarily grow faster - they will more likely be forced into and restricted to areas of relictual cold water at extreme high latitudes.

Think also of the sperm whale - the bull migrating to high latitudes (very cold water) to dine on megasquid. If these cold waters vanish (due to global warming) then we'll lose a major component of the diet of these whales. If warm water was so condusive to growing 'large/mega' squid, why is it that these beasts are today limited to cold waters? There's more to this that simple temperature; if temperature was all it was about then we'd have the largest squid species in the tropics.

Many cephalopod species are unlikely to be able to tolerate increased temperature (high latitude or deep-sea); increased temperatures will only benefit those species tolerant of increased temperature; cold-water species will simply vanish.
 

erich orser

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
1,632
I've also been reading that all the massive melting going on in polar climes will ultimately end up lowering salinity levels which would be devastating for a lot of ocean life. The reasoning behind the threatened extinction of polar bears is that their primary habitat is vanishing; these are creatures that are evolved to hunt on pack ice.

Incidentally, with that much polar ice melting and entering temperate seas, shouldn't this actually lower the water temperature by some degree? Like when you melt ice cubes in a room temperature liquid, it ends up lowering the total temperature. The influx of that much cooler water ought to have a detrimental effect on some of the major current systems. Also, as the cooler water temperatures meet more equatorial zones, won't this produce more - how should I say this - "dramatic" weather?

Global periods of warming and cooling have always been a natural, cyclical process. What has many of the planet's climatologists concerned is the fact that it appears to be happening at an accelerated rate. Mind you, in certain quarters this is still highly controversial. All I know is our weather here in S. California has definitely been getting wetter lately, and in the Southeast part of the country there have been more tropical storms and hurricanes per season recently. It may come to the point where the good citizens of New Orleans will have to tow Chef Paul Prudhomme out to block incoming storm surges with his body to save the Crescent City! :wink:
 

Euprymna

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Jul 13, 2004
Messages
97
The most dramatic effect of melting ice sheets will be indeed the lowering salinity, hence water density in n.Atlantic for instance and as a consequence will most certainly stop the conveyor belt process (transporting salt out of the N.Atlantic and heat into it) known as the thermohaline circulation. This will have a detrimental effect on current weather patterns, marine, terrestrial organisms.
 
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
63
Deflated Dream Scenario

Quick bit of gene sequencing and we can cross breed the giant squid with the polar bear and make a furred, tentacled predator that is not bothered when the pack ice vanishes, capable of pursuing seals on both sea and land, and underwater. Also would make a tasty dish for bull sperm whales!

Seriously though, are there likely to be undiscovered, very large squid in the Arctic Ocean, or are they mainly an Antarctic thing?
 

Forum statistics

Threads
20,877
Messages
206,842
Members
8,473
Latest member
bjh1951

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV (2011): Terri
TONMOCON V (2013): Jean
TONMOCON VI (2015): Taollan
TONMOCON VII (2018): ekocak


Top