New Article on The Cephalopod PAge

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Apr 8, 2004
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Thanks to Phil & Dr. Wood for taking the time to create 2 great articles. Certainly filled in some yawning gaps & clarified a few points I've struggled with :read:
I feel like my "party balloon" knowledge base has been connected directly to the Zeppelin like same of these two fine cephalopodan pedagogues & I'm fillin' up ! :notworth:
After a Bank holiday weekend having brushed up on the Cambrian, gained some invaluable prepping experience & read these 2 articles I'll confidently take on a room full of Eastenders viewers at PaleoTriv !! :grad:

"Although not as glamorous as Tyrannosaurus rex or as dramatic as Velociraptor, these extinct creatures are nonetheless quite interesting animals."

Fascinating as they are in their own right, in my opinion the creatures that have & still inhabit the oceans are light years ahead in the glamour & drama dept. of any of us landlubbers i.e
Tyrannosaurus rex v. Liopleurodon ferox ? no contest :whalevsa:
 

Phil

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Hi John, Spartacus (Hey, I'M SPARTACUS!!!),

Any new information on phylogeny of molluscs out there?

To be honest John, I really have not looked that sort of stuff up for many months so I'm afraid I couldn't really say. If I do find anything of interest, I'll let you know. Sorry, old chap!

After a Bank holiday weekend having brushed up on the Cambrian, gained some invaluable prepping experience & read these 2 articles I'll confidently take on a room full of Eastenders viewers at PaleoTriv !!

Thanks, Spartacus! Actually I was thinking about going back and changing much of that ammonite article one of these days. It was the first one of these things that I wrote and to be honest, does not really talk about the ammonites themselves that much (and the pictures are crap)...I'll get around to it one of these days. I'm trying to pull together something on prehistoric giant squids at the moment, but information is very hard to find. It will be a short one this time.

As for the Cambrian stuff, if you want to read more I would recommend:

Steven J Gould "Wonderful Life" (1989) on the Burgess Shale. A classic, even read by Jimmy Carter!

Simon Conway-Morris "Crucible of Creation"(1999). Dry reading and really a reply to Gould but written by one of the top researchers in the field so worth getting.

Richard Fortey: "Trilobite!" (2001). A brilliant little book which makes trilobites appear quite exciting and is very funny in places and full of amusing anecdotes. Fortey is a senior palaeontologist at the British Museum of Natural History in London yet somehow manages to bring up Bond villains, Australian pubs in the Outback and The Beatles. After you read this, you'll really want to find one yourself.

Also recommended about the evolution of marine life is Richard Ellis' book "Aquagenesis" (2001) which covers practically every major group of marine animals, vertebrate and invertebrate, and is very clearly written with nice illustrations. There's a good section on cephalopods too.

Phil
 
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I'm Spartacus Artisticus, you're welcome & way too modest. Thanks for the recommended reads too, Trilobite sounds right up my street & I could read it to my pet flexi-calymene. There must be something in the water, formaldehyde possibly, at the NHM as I believe they may all be a tad eccentric. I attempted to get my name in neon lights via the entomolgy dept. with the 1st capture of otiorynchus armadillo in Norfolk. All I'd actually subdued was an otiorynchus sulcatus, in my defence they're like peas in a pod & the defining difference being something like the urine dewpoint.
BTW I've a theory (already, for one so novice you all cry) on the demise of your superbly illustrated plectronoceras which I'm surprised all you bright buttons that I now mix with haven't noticed as it IS a major design fault.
Just take a look at how close this poor creature's gills are to its anus !! :shock:
Put yourself in a plectronoceras' shoes for a minute, these creatures weren't wiped by outside influences, they just gave up ! :angel:
 

Phil

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Whoa,

Is this the little critter to which you refer?

http://www.rhs.org.uk/publications/pubs/garden1202/newspests.asp

I had no idea that we were under attack by alien weevils in Southern Britain! Mind you, we get all sorts of peculiar invertebrates here in Dover, being a major port. I'm not referring to the contents of the local night club, but peculiar colonies of tiny Mediterranean scorpions infesting the old stone walls in the dock area and parts of the town. They apparantly glow under UV light, though I have not tried it myself (always wondered who first discovered that - strange). Must try and find out exactly what they are one day.

All sorts of horrendous things scuttle off the freight ships docking, especially those carrying fruit and foodstuffs. Most die quickly but not all......Another pub in the town centre that shall remain nameless, has a colony of Black Widows out the back. Had a good look at one close up once, really should have brought a camera.

Good point about the Plectronoceras, its a wonder how any animal that breathed through a cloud of its own detritus could have evolved into anything impressive... :smile:
 
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that's the fella, grab him !! I'm still convinced I was right & Max at the NHM
is unwilling to share the limelight. He didn't even return my film pot :roll:
Seems they hide in shipments of shrubberies, courtesy of Roger the Shrubber from Italia.

Dover sounds like a bug fan's Utopia. I remember seeing Sir Dave Attenborough waving a UV lamp about down there showing off them wee critters & a few years earlier (lots) he was showing off the (native ?) scorpions of Ongar station.

always wondered who first discovered that - strange
what's stranger is which deviant found cow's milk was yummy !


Dover sounds like a bug fan's Utopia. I remember seeing Sir Dave Attenborough waving a UV lamp about down there showing off them wee critters & a few years earlier (lots) he was showing off the (native ?) scorpions of Ongar station.

always wondered who first discovered that - strange
what's stranger is which deviant found cow's milk was yummy ! :yuck:

its a wonder how any animal that breathed through a cloud of its own detritus could have evolved into anything impressive

There's a lot of people out there who talk detritus !
 
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Time to make like George Romero and raise the dead thread! On Friday, a guest lecturer at Humboldt State University will be speaking on the Green Chiton. The lecture is titled "Green Chiton Eggs and H.A.M." and I hope to get the lowdown on some great mollusc development information and what happened to H.A.M. (Hypothetical Ancestral Mollusc) theory.

Hope to post more soon! Trying to earn my keep as a SC,

John
 

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