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info on distribution of nautilid fossils

robyn

Vampyroteuthis
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Jan 19, 2007
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305
Hi guys,

I've been asked to give a general-audience talk on nautilus and I'm trying to find some information on the changing distribution of nautilids over geologic time - I'm envisioning a slide with a world map, animated to show where nautilids have been found and where they lived at different stages of their evolution.

Does anyone know where I might be able to find some data on this? Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Robyn.
 

Architeuthoceras

Architeuthis
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According to the Treatise, [SIZE=-1]Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Part K, Mollusca 3, Cephalopoda-General Features-Endoceratoidea-Actinoceratoidea-Nautiloidea-Bactritoidea, Edited by R. C. Moore, Geological Society of America and University of Kansas Press, 1964, The Order Nautilida has representatives from Early Devonian (416mya) thru Recent with world wide distribution. Many Sub-orders became extinct at the end of the Triassic (199.6mya), the Sub-order Nautilina extends from Early Jurassic thru Recent again with world wide distribution. Eutrephoceras (Photo below) and Cenoceras are the two common genera from Early Jurassic to about Oligocene (33.9mya) time. Aturia is a common fossil in Paleocene to Miocene (65.5-7.25mya) rocks. The first Nautilus fossils appear in the Oligocene, and their distribution (of fossils) is; SW pacific, East Indies, Australia and Europe (USSR).
This is an old book so it may be out of date with the classification and distribution, but it still may help. I just dont know where you will find a map unless you plot all the genera listed in the treatise, which would probably be a major task in itself.
Hope this helps, and good luck.

Eutrephoceras sp. from the Coniacian (Late Cretaceous) of Utah
[/SIZE]
 

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squider

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Hi Robyn,
Not historical,but i have been squidfishing for the last 23 years on the Africa southcoast and for the first time have been finding these nautilus(alive on jiggs).I was wondering if it is common to find them here.Could you point me to somebody that has knowledge of this please,as i have only seen the shells in our shell meuseems before'
Kind Regards
Clem
 

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monty

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squider;101206 said:
Hi Robyn,
Not historical,but i have been squidfishing for the last 23 years on the Africa southcoast and for the first time have been finding these nautilus(alive on jiggs).I was wondering if it is common to find them here.Could you point me to somebody that has knowledge of this please,as i have only seen the shells in our shell meuseems before'
Kind Regards
Clem

:welcome: to TONMO!

Robyn or other experts may provide some more details soon, but I can get started by pointing out that this shell is not from an actual nautilus, but from a "paper nautilus" or argonaut, which is actually an exotic type of octopus, and only distantly related to the nautilus family. However, that doesn't make it less interesting if they're showing up in unusual numbers in your area suddenly; in fact, that sounds like the sort of thing Steve O'Shea would be particularly interested in.

Some discussion of these fascinating animals can be found here:

http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/2166/

and marinebio_guy kept one for study a year or so ago:

http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/6255/

I know Tintenfisch was visiting South Africa for ceph research a few months ago, she may have local South Africa ceph researcher contacts who would likely either know more, or be very interested in your information (or both!)
 

squider

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Sep 9, 2007
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Monty
Thanx for the welcome note.I have been reading all the contacts you gave me,allthough im not in the research or academic side of this subject at all,it seems like i can get hooked easely!:wink:This looks like the Agronauto nodosa as far as my little research shows me:hmm:.If anybody would like info from my side i would be happy to assist.:wink:
 

Tintenfisch

Architeuthis
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Hi there,

At the South African Museum there were some lovely argonaut shells - I think the collections manager said they were from two different species, in fact. I confess I didn't pay much attention to where they were from, but I assume they were loacl(ish), so they are probably known from South Africa. As for why they are appearing in increasing numbers now... I could guess at a few things (seasonal distribution, change in local water conditions, food migration) but since I really don't know anything about Argonauta biology or ecology, I probably shouldn't.

So... that was helpful. :oops:

Steve... ?

PS - Nesis (1987) includes southern Africa in the distributions of A. nodosa and A. argo.
 

squider

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Sep 9, 2007
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Robyn,sorry to have hijacked your thread!Tintenfisch, thanx for your and all the other friendly member`s response.As i can see from my little info i got sofar, it looks like these creatures have to rely on currents only to move around,so how would they be able to move to, and track food? I suppose there are many questions to be asked! Just a few days ago i saw a couple drifting past our boat,in a group together.So do they use their fleece like a sail of a dingy to navigate and change direction etc. ?Also i wonder how they manage to dive down to get to the bottom and then surface again when they need to,as we have caught them on jiggs on depths of 90 meters before. Nature is truly wonderful !!!!So many questions? it boggles the mind:bonk::bugout:Looks like im hooked,or jigged ?:confused:
 

squider

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Hi all again.
I have just heard from a fellow skipper that he has found the type with the smooth hard shell and with the flap that closes the front part....the plot thickens?? Looks like this could be the Pompillius,anyone know if this is common on the S A coastline?
 

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