From CephList: Haliphron atlanticus

Stavros

GPO
Registered
Joined
Jun 26, 2008
Messages
168
Forwarding a message that was sent on ceph list recently, has an awesome image attached:

By Lazaro Ruda:

While diving yesterday off Juno, Florida I came across a small ~4in cephalopod swimming very slowly in midwater. There was a deep water upwelling which dropped the water temperature from the mid 70s to 55 degree fahrenheit. I have looked through my id books, but I can not find a close enough id. Its behavior was unconcerned with the proximity of my camera and it never once tried to leave quickly nor did it ever ink.

I have an image of it at the following url: http://www.thelivingsea.com/unknown-ceph.jpg

Any help identifying this cephalopod is greatly appreciated.

unknown-ceph.jpg

Hello Lazaro Ruda
The animal in the picture sems young because of the forma of the arms you say it
is 4 inches long, and at very young stages I am not sure if they have already
developed the hectocotylus. Females of Haliphron can get over 2 yards long and
until now it is not really clear if there is only one species of Haliphron. I am
a taxonomist so I will recomend only to use cf. Haliphron so you will be in the
secure part of the identification.
Best wishes
Juergen

________________________________
Von: Lazaro Ruda
An: [email protected]
Gesendet: Montag, den 28. März 2011, 12:44:51 Uhr
Betreff: Re: AW: [Ceph] Help with ceph identification



The consensus seems to be that it is Haliphron atlanticus. Assuming that the
male species only display 7 arms with the hectocotylus hidden inside the mantel,
is it likely this is a female?

Laz Ruda
TheLivingSea.com
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,990
I saw the post but the picture looks so much like a drawing that I hesitate to believe it is a photo.
 
Upvote 0
Joined
Apr 19, 2010
Messages
478
It looks fairly photorealistic to me. I looked at the dude's site and everything looks like that, and he has a number of videos to corroborate his photos.

It would be nice if anyone who's had the chance to look at a full-grown specimen of Haliphron atlanticus would be able to say something about it.
 
Upvote 0
Joined
Apr 19, 2010
Messages
478
I'm almost inclined to think it's a Haliphron atlanticus too, if only on the basis of the fact that its arms gradually increase in length from the 'ventral' side to the 'dorsal' side.
 
Upvote 0
Joined
Apr 19, 2010
Messages
478
Juergen, on Cephlist, is also tossing around the genuses Japetella and Bolitaena.

I was thinking that Japetella is a little too elongate and both of Bolitaena's third arms are longer than the rest of them, but I could be wrong.
 
Upvote 0
Top