[Octopus]: Wink - Octopus Digueti

QueenB

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Cutting the Plexiglas now to secure her in the front. But having a problem with the Koralia cord pushing it up in the back. Not sure if I want to just take it out or cut a piece in the Plexiglas for the cord to go through. Any ideas? My husband wants to cut a piece out of the Plexiglas, but then it gives an escape route. How could you Octopus proof that?
 

DWhatley

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I would notch the plexiglass for the cord. We cut off the plugs,threaded the wire through, and put new plug ends on our Koralia's for one tank. What a mess when we had to replace the unit, never again. As long as the notch is relatively tight (SAND THE EDGES or it will cut the wire), it has not been a problem in our other configurations.

Love the video with the arm investigating out the side while she looks innocently observing out the front door.

The blue leg "body" may have been a shed rather than the actual critter. We thought we lost our little lobster once. Neal informed me that it had died a few months after we put it in its tank. I was examining the carcass and noted the separation between the tail and the body and that there was no meat. I kind of grinned, said, NOT and went looking for it (still with us today and continues to shed every couple of months). Very hard to see this with the little blue legs though.

I just zip the zipper around the "pole" side of the Koralia. This makes it easy to remove and clean the netting and has eliminated any issue with octopus arms.

Here is a post that CaptFish and I put together for animals we have kept successfully with octopuses.

You can put leathers and mushrooms in the tank. Polyps are not easy to identify for OK and not OK. I have one set that the octos will literally sit on but have had to remove others that look similar because the octo will touch and jerk away. I have propagated the safe species in all three tanks I keep for octos and have not bothered trying others. I've not tried Xenia with an octopus.

Gorgonians are fine but keep in mind that octopuses do not go around things so placing one in the current and away from an octopus path can be a hard location to find.

Typically, anything I try is on its own rock so that I can remove it easily or move it if it looks like the octo will cause it harm by continually crawling on it. That being said, I have a video of Maya moving a gorgonian across the 4' tank and planting it at her den door.

Snails of any sort should be fine. Like hermits, if they are eaten at all it is usually only until they know that easier food will be provided (again my vulgaris was the exception). Snails with an operculum (trap door made of material similar to your fingernail) seem to survive well. I have looked for some without to use as food but there are only a few saltwater species (and the ones I found are actually brackish) that don't have one. The one place I have seen them, and not often, is the Asian food market. Should you buy some, try a couple in fresh and a couple in saltwater. If the saltwater does not kill them after a day, they should be fine.

I always keep a red serpent star in my octo tanks (and usually some other serpent). The red/orange animals are more active than most, often live in the octopus' den (sometimes making it easier to find the octopus) and are less shy of humans. I also like to keep a couple of thorny stars in the bigger tanks since these are diurnal, can be brightly colored and seem to do well. I have read that they are algae eaters but mine have all clearly been carniverous.

Any kind of clam seems to do well and may or may not become food (not likely with a dwarf). I get them from the seafood market, leave them overnight in tank water with one water change (they need the oxygen of a full water change) to clean out whatever yucky water they came with and place them on the sand. They will help a little with water quality and don't make the mess of other mussels if they die (do watch and remove if dead though).
 

QueenB

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Update time!
She is now moved into the Black RSM 130 (66g). She is still hiding in that small piece of holey rock the last one loved. I think it's a great piece for Dwarfs and it gives me eyesight of them when I'm feeding, photos, videos, or even just watching through at her. She fits all the way up inside there and can almost disappear.

We notched the Plexiglas for the power head but removed it as I felt it was too much flow for her. My last one I think got stressed out by the flow of the pump and power head and she couldn't grip the walls well or move around. I like a lot of water flow for filtration purposes. But I decided to pull it out and remove a couple of the rocks out. I opened it up a little more space in the back so that the water flow can get behind the rocks. I might put the rocks back in, but on the sides so it's not a pile up. People don't realize when they aqua scape, they tightly stack small rock like tossing it in a pile, but then food and debris get trapped in there only to rot when you don't have enough critters to do the clean up and then your tank starts to go downhill from there. I tried to make shelves in there for her so there are many hiding place for her to explore. I hope she gets accustomed to the tank soon and starts to explore it. I also changed out the huge White coarse sponge for a smaller black one that is pressed against the vent and rinse it daily.

I put red plastic wrapping over the plexiglas and it doesn't matter whether the red is on with the lights or just lights with no plexiglas, she still comes to the doorway of the den and then back in when I try to feed her. (I can't photo with the red light on because my camera can't focus it. It looks like a big red neon blob)

They did try to pick the smallest fiddlers they had, but sadly I think their still too big & she doesn't want to eat them. I starved her for a day & skewered one for her and hoping she would take it, I tried twice but nope. Just pushed it back out. But gladly took the skewered thawed shrimp.

Lately she's getting bolder and comes right to the very edge of the hole and peers out at me. I think that's her way of telling me she's hungry so I try to feed her some thawed shrimp. I stick a tiny piece in and she blows it out of her den. But if I wiggle the skewered shrimp near her arms and play kind of a tug of war with her. She grabs it and goes to town on it. She still won't touch the shore shrimp either. I've skewered 3 and she refuses to eat them. But I have 2 large ones in the tank with her now in hopes that she will venture out and start eating on her own. (blue legs on the bottom as well since she ate the 2 in her previous tank) She eats around 12 pm and sometimes at 12 am - 2 am.

I have a big flat screen TV across from her tank at an angle. (weird living room shape) To help with the process of seeing people moving around and such. We keep the living room lights off, so just the tank lights and TV are on. I also sit on a step stool about 5 ft away from the tank and watch her as she's at the entrance, but she only explores the holes in her rock with her arms. It's a start and I'm excited she's trying. She may need more time adjusting to this tank, but honestly she's a little more active in exploring the holes in this rock since I moved her to this one.

I'm gonna introduce a few of the Corals this week, and place them away from her den. I'm gonna watch closely and if anything bothers her, it's going back in the IM 38.

Posting some photos up I took on the Olympus E-600 and got a few decent shots.

I still can't get her outside enough to take photos like the original ones where she glowed blue around the edges of her whole body.

1) trying to get the bubbles from the skimmer down in the front. Pump was too much current I think. The Shore Shrimps were banging off the walls and I didn't even give them any sugar. :lol:



2) Acclimating her to the new tank water.


3) So many Air bubbles!


4) Peekaboo


A tank shot of how much room she has now.


Notice the Shore shrimp right outside her den?
 
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QueenB

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I would notch the plexiglass for the cord. We cut off the plugs,threaded the wire through, and put new plug ends on our Koralia's for one tank. What a mess when we had to replace the unit, never again. As long as the notch is relatively tight (SAND THE EDGES or it will cut the wire), it has not been a problem in our other configurations.

Love the video with the arm investigating out the side while she looks innocently observing out the front door.

The blue leg "body" may have been a shed rather than the actual critter. We thought we lost our little lobster once. Neal informed me that it had died a few months after we put it in its tank. I was examining the carcass and noted the separation between the tail and the body and that there was no meat. I kind of grinned, said, NOT and went looking for it (still with us today and continues to shed every couple of months). Very hard to see this with the little blue legs though.

I just zip the zipper around the "pole" side of the Koralia. This makes it easy to remove and clean the netting and has eliminated any issue with octopus arms.

Here is a post that CaptFish and I put together for animals we have kept successfully with octopuses.

You can put leathers and mushrooms in the tank. Polyps are not easy to identify for OK and not OK. I have one set that the octos will literally sit on but have had to remove others that look similar because the octo will touch and jerk away. I have propagated the safe species in all three tanks I keep for octos and have not bothered trying others. I've not tried Xenia with an octopus.

Gorgonians are fine but keep in mind that octopuses do not go around things so placing one in the current and away from an octopus path can be a hard location to find.

Typically, anything I try is on its own rock so that I can remove it easily or move it if it looks like the octo will cause it harm by continually crawling on it. That being said, I have a video of Maya moving a gorgonian across the 4' tank and planting it at her den door.

Snails of any sort should be fine. Like hermits, if they are eaten at all it is usually only until they know that easier food will be provided (again my vulgaris was the exception). Snails with an operculum (trap door made of material similar to your fingernail) seem to survive well. I have looked for some without to use as food but there are only a few saltwater species (and the ones I found are actually brackish) that don't have one. The one place I have seen them, and not often, is the Asian food market. Should you buy some, try a couple in fresh and a couple in saltwater. If the saltwater does not kill them after a day, they should be fine.

I always keep a red serpent star in my octo tanks (and usually some other serpent). The red/orange animals are more active than most, often live in the octopus' den (sometimes making it easier to find the octopus) and are less shy of humans. I also like to keep a couple of thorny stars in the bigger tanks since these are diurnal, can be brightly colored and seem to do well. I have read that they are algae eaters but mine have all clearly been carnivorous.

Any kind of clam seems to do well and may or may not become food (not likely with a dwarf). I get them from the seafood market, leave them overnight in tank water with one water change (they need the oxygen of a full water change) to clean out whatever yucky water they came with and place them on the sand. They will help a little with water quality and don't make the mess of other mussels if they die (do watch and remove if dead though).

Interesting post! Thanks

I was thinking on adding some color do you think Red flame scallop & Orange or Blue Linkia starfish might be ok? If not I'll be searching for some Colorful serpents. Probably just one. I have a HUGE Green Brittle Starfish in my other IM 38G tank that I target feed. I just want some color in there.

I like target feeding as it is less messy, and they get their fill without having just dump the PE Mysis (or whatever you use)in the tank and making just a mess. I used to tend to overfeed. A LOT! :oops: I've gotten much better at it.

That IM skimmer I got works so far, It's skimming, but I'm trying to fine tune it to get the nasty green black gunk. The adapters to hold it onto the tank is USELESS! It has plastic screws that hold the bracer in place, but the holes are stripped or something. I can't get it to tighten up. I took it off and had to put egg crate in the bottom of the tank and set it on top of that so that it can do its job. I can't put the awesome stock skimmer in there because of the sump design not leaving me room for the media basket that holds that coarse sponge in place. But as long as this works I'm happy. I put some extra coarse carbon sponges in the back to help filter, and get rid of all the tiny bubbles.

Do you think it would be too much if I stuck the air pump & fine mist stone in there to make sure there's enough gas air exchange since it's an enclosed AIO unit? I know the skimmer helps with putting air back in there and the filter pump as well.

She's so tiny, but I just want to make sure she's getting everything she needs.
 

DWhatley

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Nix on the green brittle. The green's are notorious for becoming aggressive. For a long time I thought there may be 2 varieties and the one we had for years was passive (almost delicate) until he reached a certain size and almost overnight became very aggressive, attacking anything it could make contact with in the tank. Ultimately he had his own tank. The other star I know of that warrants caution is the Bahama based upon one incident. The star may not have trapped the octopus but it was found covering the den and the previously lively octo dead. Since they externalize their stomachs and digest food outside the body, the keeper feared the octopus was trapped and killed by either suffocation or digestive juices.

The linkia would not be aggressive but they are so prone to infection and dissolving that I would not risk it in the tank for fear of losing the star or creating an infectious environment for the octopus. This thinking is conjecture only and may not have a good basis for concern.

Air stones may be a concern if the bubbles can get trapped in the mantle. There have been a couple of fatal observations but also a lot of airstones in tanks without incident.

Interesting that it likes the table shrimp (which is fine for food) over the shore shrimp. Officinalis cuttlefish have been in experiments where they seem to have a food preference based upon what they see while still in the egg. A couple of attempts with the smaller bandensis, however, have not seemed to influence food choice. Available food where the animal lived still may impact its choice or what it views as acceptable.
 

QueenB

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She's still refusing the fiddlers & there is only 1 shore shrimp in the tank today swimming. But she still takes thawed shrimp pieces and seems to be enjoying the blue legs. She's has eaten 3 already and has a 4th large shell in her den. (faintly hears tiny crab screams..."Hey, I'm not supposed to be dinner!" :lol:)

She's has been shy since I introduced her into the bigger tank.(RSM) She's always in that piece of rock I have with just that one little eye peering out of the rock. I've been sitting and watching her while I'm cleaning up pieces of crab or debris out of the tank and sump sponge, and making sure it's tip top. She just sits in her den and if I get too close moving the corals around or wiping the glass down she pulls in tighter. She's always watching.



I have read so many journals and don't remember anyone warning to keep a camera or cell phone ready for photos. Because she sure is fast when I want to take a photo. She likes to come to the edge and watch and take her arms through all the holes in that piece of rock. (I swear that rock has a vacuum in it) I'm in slow motion when I slowly try to grab the camera to not make any quick movements and (sucking sound) she's gone out of sight.

She has been getting braver and more trusting I think, but hard for me to maneuver a camera or cell phone while feeding. So I try to take what photos I can and try not to stress her out or scare her.






Yesterday afternoon when passing through the living room I see this. I think she was trying to pull the piece of Zoa Rock to her doorway.



That's all I have for an update today. I'm satisfied with her coming to the edge and watching me, that she's eating, and starting to get comfortable. I just hope I have a few months with her before she passes. I'm enjoying her in the living room immensely with those curious arms in and out all the time.
 

DWhatley

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LOL, you must have missed some of my suggestions on keeping a camera on a tripod in the room and getting a remote control if your camera accepts one :wink:. Somewhere I posted about holding the camera with my LEFT hand (note all cameras are set up for right hand use) and trying to feed and video at the same time.

The zoas make me nervous. They tend to have a nasty poison and may be why the octopus is trying to place a rock between its den and the zoas (not all zoanthids have strong palytoxin, but few aquarists know much about the species they keep).
 

QueenB

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Tripod is out and ready but where the rock is positioned my tripod is not tall enough to get a decent shot when she's at the den entrance. Time to look for a taller one.

I pulled out all my Zoa's. Now theres just a handful of Blue Legs, 1 Lg Mexican Turbo Snail, 1 Shore Shrimp still dancing around, 1 Palythoa group (7heads), 1 Toadstool (small), & 1 large Gonipora. But everything is spaced out so I can watch over her and make sure she is ok with them. I might still even pull those out to be safe. I'm getting nervous about corals in there now.

She took 3 pencil head size peices of thawed shrimp tonight! That's the most she has eaten since I have had her. Normally it's 1 maybe 2. Sometimes she will spit out the piece she's still chewing on to grab and devour the new piece. (I wait about 20-30 minutes between pieces. I'm not sure how long it takes them to eat) if she doesn't want more she normally blows at the skewered shrimp and that's my signal she is full. She isn't aggressive with the skewer much anymore, just one arm wraps around it as she pulls the shrimp off and back inside the den she goes. I love the full cheek look she has when she eats! Reminds me of my kids in the high chair shoving grapes or watermellon balls in their mouths. Lol

I want to try another fiddler, but I'm waiting until she comes out more and explores the tank at night. I don't mind putting it on a skewer, but she doesn't eat them. I'd rather not waste any, and hope she just needs to become more relaxed in her environment.

I also don't want to let a fiddler loose in the tank except if she is out ready to feed.

OMG!!!! You were right the fiddler tank does foul fast! I put about 2 tiny pieces of shrimp or a few fish pellets for them to eat on the dry part of their tank. I do clean it every 3 days, but today I got a good wiff of the fiddler tank as I was cleaning it. Boy that'll wake you right up! Husband looked at me and just smiled because his sniffer doesn't work. (He was born without being able to smell) Lucky bugger! Lol
 

DWhatley

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(He was born without being able to smell)
I am not sure if that would be a blessing or an encumbrance. I have, at least twice, avoided a likely serious fire (one gasoline in a leaky carburetor hose and one an electrical fire in an aquarium light) but there are plenty of times I would love my nose to be less sensitive. I hope you made him change diapers :wink:

Fiddlers don't eat much and the simpler the environment the better. I kept two 2 gallon plastic tanks. One housed the crabs, water and a couple of rocks for them to climb (in the center, otherwise they will escape and go farther than you think possible). At the end of the week (or sooner if necessary), I put new water in the empty tank, added the fiddlers, rinsed the rock and put it in the new tank and cleaned the old. The second tank was not really necessary as a bucket would do but it was easier on my maintenance schedule just to swap them to a new home.
 

QueenB

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:sun:I move the fiddlers to a spare tupperware container and rinse them clean with fresh brackish water. Then put some pieces of shrimp or fish pellets and let them eat. I clean the rock and substrate that's in their tank (Large pet carrier) and put them back in.

As for my nose he swears I can smell an ant fart. :lol: I have an extremely sensitive nose and has paid off when his old pickup sprung an oil leak from an oil pump breaking on a long road trip. Once in a great while he can smell something I'm cooking. I don't know what It would be like not being able to smell. I hope I never lose my sense of smell. I love the smell of fresh baked cookies, or the smell of my BBQ grill going. Oh my 3 am and I'm craving a BBQ!
 

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