Tentacles - Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBARI) Exhibit

DWhatley

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Nautilus Eggs in the Tentacles Exhibit!

nautilusEgg.jpg
 

DWhatley

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Pajama Squid!
We’re geeking out over the newest addition to our Tentacles exhibition: the striped pyjama squid!

These shy cephalopods have never been displayed in the United States before. To make it happen, our aquarists figured out how to rear these little ready-for-bedtime-squid from eggs to hatchlings and finally to
We’re geeking out over the newest addition to our Tentacles exhibition: the striped pyjama squid!

These shy cephalopods have never been displayed in the United States before. To make it happen, our aquarists figured out how to rear these little ready-for-bedtime-squid from eggs to hatchlings and finally to adults able to lay viable eggs.

MBARIPajamaSquid.gif
 

DWhatley

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Flamboyant Laying Eggs

Published on Mar 3, 2016
Cracking the code of cuttlefish courtship was critical to the success of the "Tentacles" exhibition. Our cunning husbandry team created the perfect circumstances to keep the critters comfortable and cajole them into crafting their crèches—like this careful and concerned mother flamboyant caressing her incubating cuttle-babies. Learn more about these colorful cephalopods: http://mbayaq.co/1WuvObF

 

DWhatley

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Deep-sea flapjack octopus return to Tentacles!

Last week, deep-sea researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and our cephalopod aquarists found several flapjack octopus (Opisthoteuthis sp.) in the deep waters of the Monterey submarine canyon during a research cruise.

MBARI researchers suspect that our local flapjack octopus might be a new species. These individuals were collected as a part of ongoing research into their taxonomy and mysterious deep-ocean biology. They’re currently on display in our Tentacles special exhibition, in a custom exhibit that boasts chilly water, lowered oxygen levels and red-lit darkness designed to keep deep-sea cephalopods comfortable.

We don’t know how long they’ll be visible to the public before returning behind the scenes—in some cases, deep-sea cephalopods only remain on exhibit for a few days at a time, before returning to a dark, quiet area where aquarists can closely study them. Thanks to the unique partnership between MBARI and the Aquarium, thousands of people have had the chance to meet these deep-sea denizens, members of a community of animals living in the planet’s largest—and least explored—habitat.

 

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