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Squid ID?

Phil

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Clem, I think you might be bang on target with Pholidoteuthis. Having looked at photos of the diamond-back this afternoon, I don't think I've got the other squid right. The fins don't look pronounced enough though it is hard to tell in the photo.

Why do I even pretend I could hazard a guess? I have not got the faintest idea about either of them!
 

Clem

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Oi! Self-deprecation! Phil, your sepioid suggestion might not have been far off the mark. There are bathyteuthids known as "comb-fins," whose fins extend nearly the full length of the mantle, supported by very thin ribs. Hard to be sure, but in the first photo of the series, it looks like the Mozambique beastie might have such fins. The second photo in the series shows a hard line running around the mid-line of the mantle: perhaps the fin folded down against the body?

Clem
 

Steve O'Shea

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....hmmmmmm

Well, again they've gone out of their way to take photographs that miss all of the systematic characters you need to make an informed identification.

The Gulf of Mexico beast - interesting. The scales are too small for it to be Lepidoteuthis, and it does look as if it had tentacles (the two narrow limbs, partially in shot); Lepidoteuthis by this stage (mantle length - even though no scale is provided it is obvious we are not looking at a paralarva) has only 8 arms (the tentacles would be several mm long, filamentous and not visible) ; so, Lepidoteuthis can be discounted.

We get Pholidoteuthis boschmai here in New Zealand waters; I've never seen an adult with tentacles (they are always lost/jettisoned/?autotomised at capture); but whatever it is it certainly is not this species. I've not ever seen P. adami (other than pics in books) - but if that is a colour photograph (I am having trouble - am quite colour blind; things look very brown/purply or black to me) then I doubt it is a Pholidoteuthis (the colour of which is very (indisputably) red for both P. adami and P. boschmai). The way the skin has abraded from the posterior portion of the mantle (the pointy end; where the skin goes from scaley and dark to smooth and white) is very Pholidoteuthis-like (I think there's something interesting in this area in live Pholidoteuthis that is lost during capture; either fantastically delicate skin, something glandular or something structural; I'd love to know what it was).

It could very easily be a species of Mastigoteuthis (including those referred to Echinoteuthis or Magnoteuthis); I've seen large things just like this before, this colour (if a colour pic) ... and in fact am describing one right now. I really need to see the 'tail' on the beast, a close-up pic of the sucker rings and a squiz at either the mantle- or funnel-locking cartilage to make an ident (in fact the locking cartilage would suffice to make an ident).

Re the other pic, I've seen one Thysanoteuthis rhombus only (bizarre, taken from 50°S - well outside of its recognised distribution). What struck me when I first looked at it was how similar it was to Sepioteuthis in overall facies. In fact Thysanoteuthis was first described as a Sepioteuthis, so we weren't the first to make that mistake. I'll either/or this myself right now (though the eye is a give away).

I think the other squid you refer to (the one with ribs down the fins) ... is that Chthenopteryx? Chthenopteryx is a very distinctive (and small) squid .... not a lot like this brute I'm afraid.

Disclaimer "everything written above could be total nonsense"
Cheers
O
 

Clem

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Steve O'Shea said:
...I really need to see the 'tail' on the beast, a close-up pic of the sucker rings and a squiz at either the mantle- or funnel-locking cartilage to make an ident (in fact the locking cartilage would suffice to make an ident).
What's a squiz?

:|

Clem
 

Steve O'Shea

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Sorry Clem, that's 'Steve speak' for 'good look'.

Hiding away in an office or spending most of my time in solitude (at sea/home) I tend to invent my own language.
Cheers
O
 

Steve O'Shea

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Hmmmmmmmmm.

Stab in the dark, but most likely a spent/mature female Moroteuthis, and based on the attenuated tail, one of either M. robsoni or M. robusta.

Hard to say though .... would like to check out the tentacular club armature (to look for hooks).

Where do you find all of these?
Cheers
O
 

Clem

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Steve,

I noticed that the first arms are noticeably smaller than the rest on this Moroteuthis. Is that common to all Moros?

As for where I find these pictures, I just run a Google image search, using the word "squid" with different modifiers. Lots of pictures of disappointed looking fishermen hoisting Dosidicus. There's a few images of your more hirsute self, as well.

Clem
 

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