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Squid ID?

Clem

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Clem said:
could photophores on the mantle be obscured by the bright wash of lights from the ROV?
After looking at the Histioteuthis images over at Tolweb, my answer to my own question is "probably not." Even in the glare of submersible lights, Histioteuthis still clearly shows its mantle & arm photophores. Different Histio species have photophores of varying prominence and reflectivity (sometimes because of sexual dimorphism), but they're still hard to miss.

An e-mailed plea for help is currently making its way through hawaii.edu. Should have an answer soon.

Grrr.
 

Phil

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Just a thought, but if this were Histioteuthis (and I know no-one is saying that it is), then where are the tentacles? Shouldn't the mantle be covered in clearly visible light organs scattered all over the body and arms? I can't believe the lights from the ROV would drown out all of the photophores. (Sorry Clem, not copying you, I looked at some pictures of Histioteuthis and had a similar thought).

Make sure you get a decent reply from Hawaii, OK?
 

Clem

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Five minutes later (literally)...

Ms. Rachel Shackelford has written to inform me that our mystery squid "has been identified as Histioteuthis hoylei."

Thanks to Rachel and to Ms. Tara Hicks, both at hawaii.edu, for chasing down this information.

For details, see Tolweb's Histioteuthis hoylei entry, here:

http://tolweb.org/tree?group=Histioteuthis_hoylei&contgroup=Histioteuthidae

Perhaps I'm just tired, but I still don't see any photophores on the squid that started all of this.


:sleeping:

Clem
 

Clem

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Here's the latest from Rachel Shackelkford, Data Manager at SOEST/HURL:


Hi Adam,

Since you guys seem so interested in this animal, I thought I'd send you a couple more images. When I have time, I might see about putting a video clip up on the web too.

The ROV does have a couple lasers, 6 inches apart, used for scale. Unfortunately, in these images I can only see one of them. The other may be camouflaged in the squid. The recollection of one of the guys here who was onboard during this dive was that the squid was about 2-3 ft long.

The principal investigator for that particular dive was Frank Parrish of the National Marine Fisheries Service. The ROV pilots (camera operators) for that dive were Chris Taylor and Dan Greeson, both HURL employees at the time.

Aloha,
Rachel



Thank you, Rachel, for your generous assistance. Such public-mindedness is rare. Thanks again to Tara Hicks, for putting me in touch with the right data manager. The two "new" Histioteuthis hoylei images are attached below (visible photophores included). Rachel Shackelford has also updated the photo caption for the beastie at soest.hawaii.edu.

Clem



 

Steve O'Shea

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....and thank you too Clem :thumbsup: !!! Yes, I'm very happy referring the animal to Histioteuthis now (now that the photophores are apparent).

When we first started our work on live squid years ago I was often observed scratching my head - the live animals are very different from the preserved museum specimens and you had to learn an entirely new suite of characters/character states and mannerisms to identify them (without handling them). Nowadays I still scratch my head, but that might be the company I keep :wink:

It is very difficult identifying genera on the basis of single images, especially when important systematic characters cannot be discerned. Nice that this identification can be confirmed.
Cheers
O
 

Jean

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I'm soooooooo glad it's been ID'd and not as a Moroteuthis species!!! I was just waiting for smoeone to ID it as the incredibly rare Moroteuthis fuzzballii:lol:


I'm afraid I'm still slightly in the "why would anyone ask ME??" state :oops: I believe we grow out of it tho' don't we????????

J
 

Clem

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A recent image search turned up two more squid sans identification, which I've attached below. One of the squid was scooped up in a net by a fly-fisherman, from the water's surface near Inhaca Island, Mozambique.

The other one appears on a very strange web-page, devoted to speculations on how the alien creatures from James Cameron's "The Abyss" could have generated a controlled tsunami. The pictured squid was said to have been trawled from the Gulf of Mexico.

The Mozambique teuthid's eye, pictured in close-up, appears to have a large photophore on its surface; the other squid, rather poorly photographed, appears to have been fatally confused by its context.

To see the photos in their original contexts, click on the links below.

:?:





http://www.africanfishing.com/indigo/
http://www.innerx.net/personal/tsmith/DolphinAbyss.html
 

Phil

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That first picture: no idea.

The second, perhaps it is a juvenile Thysanoteuthis (Diamond backed squid) or possibly a Sepioteuthis. I basing this on photos in Mark Norman's book.

Mind you, I was completely wrong last time and I'm probably completely wrong now!
 

Clem

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Phil, between the two of us, we might get somewhere. I had no guesses about the Mozambique squid, and one guess for the Gulf critter: Pholidoteuthius adami. Despite the not-so-great quality of the photo, you can make out lots of little bumps on the mantle; these dermal pads are consistent with Pholidoteuthis morphology, as are the large fins, round head and slight tentacular clubs. P. adami is also common in the Gulf of Mexico. (For more details, check out the link below.)

Any other USOs out there? Besides the ones Steve and Kat like to drop hints about? :roll:

Clem

http://tolweb.org/tree?group=Pholidoteuthis_adami&contgroup=Pholidoteuthidae
 

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