Responsibilities associated with keeping and breeding cephs

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cthulhu77

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marinebio_guy;82993 said:
It can work to a point. As I said the Kemp's ridley sea turtle is a good expample, and I can give lots of facts to back it up, also Bald Eagle, White Sea Bass, the list can go on. To make a broad statement that there is no way any of them can work is absurd.

Good Heaven's! Sorceress, I wonder how much each of those meetings cost us? :shock:

MBG: it is not at all absurd. You are basing your experience in three unproven relocation/redistribution efforts. The bald eagle was never in any imminent danger, but was used to railroad many companies. Ever been to Alaska?
The white sea bass is now considered a "pest" fish, with almost no limits on catch, as it has denuded local fish to the point of extermination.
I can make a far longer list of failures than you can of success's. As far as the sea turtle goes, wasn't the point of that to avoid predation upon the juveniles? Not re-introduction or impression ?

Check your facts.

greg
 

nezw0001

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Off topic, I know, but most peregrines gracing our skies right now are from captive stocks through the Peregrine Fund, Tom Cade, and a plethora of peregrine breeders who had been producing falcons for falconry. I have worked with the Raptor Center in MN and they can trace the lineage of the majority of breeding peregrines back to captive stocks through their pedigree system. Sorry just my pet project being and veterinarian and falconer.
 


Fini

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Some of the comments made in this thread really left a bad taste in my mouth. Is it really that hard to be civil in this debate? I can feel some passion on this topic, just try to keep it kind so no one is turned off.
 

cthulhu77

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nezw0001;83000 said:
Off topic, I know, but most peregrines gracing our skies right now are from captive stocks through the Peregrine Fund, Tom Cade, and a plethora of peregrine breeders who had been producing falcons for falconry. I have worked with the Raptor Center in MN and they can trace the lineage of the majority of breeding peregrines back to captive stocks through their pedigree system. Sorry just my pet project being and veterinarian and falconer.

I am also a class 3 falconer, and certainly the efforts of the early breedings had an impact upon the wild introduction. Now we have Peregrines where they never existed before, too...guess those Prairie Falcons will just have to find prey somewhere else, hmmm?
 

cthulhu77

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Animal Mother;83010 said:
The California Condors of the Grand Canyon...


Check their status. It is a great PR job...but, a failure all in all. Even the cranes have an impact on the local ecological damage. Yes, we as human beings have managed to screw up many an animal species role in the natural habitat. The problem is, when you try to fix something that has already been repaired, you are making further glitches. Why did the condor become near extinct? Was it due to human intervention. No.
The cranes are a sad story, as is the demise of the passenger pidgeon, and hundreds of species per year. Captive breeding is not the answer, wildlife management of a responsible nature is. We need to stop screwing around with everything, including collecting octopus.
 

tonmo

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Some of the comments made in this thread really left a bad taste in my mouth. Is it really that hard to be civil in this debate? I can feel some passion on this topic, just try to keep it kind so no one is turned off.
Thanks Fini -- we've discussed this a bit as staff. I believe strongly that alignment is key -- there are some frustrations coming through with a "soft spot" in our forum moderation and we'll address by year's end.

Collectively, I am confident I can speak for staff when I say we are staunchly in support of open discussion and self-regulation within the community -- however, we believe we can do more to define the framework of our beliefs when it comes to responsible ceph keeping.

I agree, Fini, the tone in this thread and perhaps one or two others is a bit of a downer and is not at all in the spirit of TONMO.com. Again, I feel an overall weak spot has been exploited a bit and I intend to ensure it gets addressed by way of a clearer statement of purpose and a better articulation of our collective philosophy on cephs and ceph care.

Thanks for everyone's patience!
 
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