Recommendation for a RO/DI System not under the sink

Pennyworth

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I recently purchased this RO/DI system which seems like a great product, except it needs to be mounted and attached to the pipes under the sink.

I would like something where I can attach something to the faucet and filter water this way into a tank/dispenser, perhaps overnight.

Would anyone have a recommendation for this type of system?
 
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Mine looks like that, but I have it hooked up to a basement faucet - I'll go check what the fittings look like. I don't have the tank, though...
 

DHyslop

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While that's not the greatest RODI in the world, you can modify it to serve your purpose and it will work fine.

How much water do you plan to make and how often?
 

Pennyworth

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While that's not the greatest RODI in the world, you can modify it to serve your purpose and it will work fine.

How much water do you plan to make and how often?

I will only use it to make water for my tank for topoffs and water changes.

I would think I would have to only fill the 75 gallon tank once every six weeks or so.

Isn't that RO/DI system above average in quality? At least on paper? Or should I have gotten one that was more suited to an aquarium?

I can still return it and have not set it up yet, so would like to hear any alternatives you would suggest.

Are you looking for something like this
?

Yes, pretty much something like that that is easy to attach and detach.
 

DWhatley

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RO/DI is RO/DI the quality comes in with the RO filter condition, DI resin packing and condition and water pressure. Pretty much any home system will produce the same quality of water with clean filters over differing periods of time with different waste water quantities. The 100 gpd (gallons per day) vs the 48 gpd RO filters are not interchangeable but still work the same way. Note that you will NOT get either of those numbers from household water pressure. I get roughly 20 gpd on my 100 gpd rated system. In all cases, the gpd quoted requires additional pressure. My 20 gpd seems to be about standard for any of the home systems with household water pressure.

You can search for portable RO/DI (or counter top) for units that are a bit less cumbersome but many of them don't have the more rigorous carbon and particulate prefilters (and will produce less water than the larger units for the life of the filters and over a day). As a minimum you will want one particulate and one carbon prefilter, an RO filter and a a DI filter.

Alternately, for a temporary but fixed placement you can mount your current system on a board (piece of plywood) to help keep it more manageable and mount/place that board under your sink (keep in mind you will need to be replacing the filters when you decide how to attach the board) then just connect and disconnect the water supply with a faucet attachment.

I'll bet you never expected getting started was going to be this complex. On the other hand think of all the things you have learned along the way :biggrin2:. If it helps any, we've all "been there"
 
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Mine worked for my purposes, it seemed to keep the water clean enough for cuttlefish. Still haven't looked at fitting, although I spent a lot of time in the laundry room today :shock: Hot water heater sprang a leak and then I broke off the knob for the shut-off valve - friendly neighbor plumber is coming tomorrow morning to install new hot water heater... my less than handy hubby thought he could install it by himself... :roflmao:
 

DWhatley

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My extremely handy spouse still sucks at household plumbing (does great with tanks). He rolls his eyes at me when I insist on double checking for leaks and then, it leaks. I think he just can't believe that something with such a simple concept requires a knack that he does not have.

I will probably have the first hotwater tank to start leaking from rusting from the OUTSIDE!. My FW capture bucket is wedged next to the upstairs hot water heater and is showing rust from the messy spills.
 

DHyslop

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Looking at it more closely, this is an RO unit, not an RODI. This just has a second carbon cartridge, whereas aquarium-specific units will have a final stage of deionizing resin to remove ions like nitrate and phosphate that are too small for the membrane itself to remove. This makes sense given that it's meant for drinking water, where that level of purity isn't really necessary. With this in mind, I wouldn't recommend this unit.

They cost a bit more, but I recommend the BRS units. The push-connect fittings are the finest I've seen and use a double-gasket design that holds the hose firmly in place in two places so it doesn't twist around and leak. They also have a dual TDS meter, which is pretty much necessary to know whether your DI is depleted or not. They also have flush valves and pressure gauges which are very useful, although not quite as necessary. Another thing is they come with the Dow FilmTec membranes, which are the best in the industry and really not all that much more expensive than the knockoffs.

For the water supply you can definitely just attach/detach an adapter to the faucet itself, but it might be easier to just get a 3/8" valve adapter. It's real easy -- you don't need to be a plumber to put it in -- you just unscrew the flexible hose from the faucet underneath the sink and screw it in.
 

DWhatley

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Good catch Dan, I missed that entirely and forgot that for a long time (no longer the case) DI water was not considered potable so many drinking water units still will not have a DI resin stage. The 5th stage (post RO carbon) in this unit is unnecessary for aquarium use.
 

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