Permo-Triassic cephalopod hunt

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Mar 7, 2009
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Today's trip didn't actually result in any cephalopods since I ran out of daylight, but there was a beautiful late afternoon light over interesting scenery and I now know how to get to the locations.

The first photo shows white Permo-Triassic limestones caught up beneath the huge slab of Cretaceous ocean crust that was obducted onto continental crust here during Late Cretaceous time. The darker rocks in the distance are ophiolite (ocean crust). The picture with the palm trees also shows typical ophiolite scenery.

The red rocks beneath the ancient watchtower are deep-water sediments intensely folded during the emplacement of the ophiolite. The detail of the near-vertical bedded red rocks shows Permian cephalopod limestones. Triassic breccias and platy limestones are a short distance to the right of this view.

I'll add some cephalopod pictures after the next visit.
 

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Terri

Sepia elegans
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What a beautiful, mysterious place Oman is, I don't know why but "mysterious" always comes to mind when I view the beautiful horizons there. I'm with Kevin, looking forward to this!
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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hummm, now if I was planning a trip without concern of the cost ... Utah or Oman ... some how the excepts win hands down :wink:
 
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It's true, there is a lot to like here.

So, I went back today (with a couple of accomplices) and yes D, a hike up a mountain was involved. There was some very fossiliferous rock up there and we found several ammonoids together with orthocones, corals, crinoids, bivalves and brachiopods.

We stopped at Bidbid fort (top photo) on the way, drove through some fine scenery, had lunch on an outcrop of red deep-sea cherts (with the Euphorbia in the foreground), and eventually looked up at that outcrop of limestone, our destination for the day.
 

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Continuing up the hill ...

There were these interesting plants on the way up. I think they are Physorrhynchus chamaerapistrum, a member of the mustard family.

As you'd guess, the view from the top was spectacular. After a while we gave our attention to the large blocks of Permian and Triassic limestone in their matrix of Triassic (Lower Dienerian) breccia.
 

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This block consists of lowermost Triassic coquina limestones resting on Middle Permian (Wordian) reefal limestones with corals, calcarous sponges and stromatoporoids.

The coquinas are packed with bivalves (Promyalina, Claraia and Eumorphotis), with an occasional ammonoid or brachiopod (rhynchonellids).

The ammonoid in the photos looks like a Pseudogyronites to me.
 

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