Octo tank help

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2002
Messages
5,803
I know we tend to think only of rocks for den making, but shells are good material for dens, too. Younger octos live in the shell and older octos can use them for doors. It's good when you can encourage your octo to concentrate on moving smaller things in the tank, not always huge rocks!

Nancy
 


squall7733

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Oct 19, 2005
Messages
98
Really, like conch shells? No clue where to get some of those really. Only Conch shells I've seen are currently occupied by a snail :P

I'll try to track some down before I oder my little buddy.

One sudden question that came to mind is this liveshrimp.com thing. How much do you feed them a day once theyve gotten to a decent size?
 

squall7733

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Oct 19, 2005
Messages
98
Haha, just thinking some more after reading a few more articles....

Say you open the lid for feeding, what if your bimac decides he wants out... And crawls up into the opening... Assuming you could grab him and try to put him back in the water, but lol what happens if he latches onto you and wont let go?

Thats my real question, what do you do if he gets a hold of you and doesnt want to let your hand go? Will that ever happen or are they too shy. I've been reading alot and it sounds like a person and a octo could get into that sort of close relationship eventualy. I always thought those suction cups caused damage if they latched onto you, well thats what I was taught as a child anyways.
 

Feelers

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
Joined
Jul 10, 2005
Messages
332
I've been reading a book by jaques cousteau and for o Vulgaris they turn the mantle of the octo over, and they aparently release. However this is while diving, so dont try it !!!, unless one of the experts here can confirm this?
Great book btw, J C is quite a writer.
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2005
Messages
80
squall7733 said:
Thats my real question, what do you do if he gets a hold of you and doesnt want to let your hand go?

Hello again,

I see on another thread that you're most likely going to get a bimac. If that's the case, you've got little to worry about. Bimacs don't have a reputation for biting so if one grabs you all you have to do is wait a few minutes till the octo has learned what he wants to know about you after which he'll let go and move on to some other activity. Even though they've got pretty good eyesight an octopus gets the bulk of its information from its suckers which are sensitive to both touch and taste. When an octo grabs you it's usually just trying to figure out what you are and if you're edible (you're not and they can figure that out).

OTOH: KNOW YOUR SPECIES!!!

There are some species of octopus that seem to use biting as a first line of defense. In my area we have O. rubescens witch is an absolute biting fool! Further, they have a toxin that makes their bite seriously painful. And, of course, there are the various 'blue-ringed' species that bite fairly often and that can kill you!

As far as the suckers causing any injury to you - don't worry about it. So long as you let the octo let go on its own terms there ought not to be any aftermath whatsoever. The priority is to let things progress at the octo's pace. If you try to force it to let go you could end up with several minor 'hickies' but the real concern is that you could do some damage to an octo that's just being curious.

As an aside, the other octopus we have around here is the Giant Pacific Octopus and I've heard a number of funny/scary stories about GPO's causing serious problems for scuba divers. I've never heard of one of these being actually aggressive toward a diver but they are very curious. A local marine biologist who studies octo behavior has had numerous instances of a GPO wondering about some piece of scuba gear and forcibly removing from him for closer examination - he's lost swim fins, gloves, face masks, and even mouthpieces. Another aquaintance once allowed a GPO to crawl onto his head so that his wife could photograph it. While there, at a depth of about 60 feet, the GPO got to wondering what might be inside the air regulator. When it started feeling around inside the housing it managed to jam some part of the mechanism such that he suddenly had no air. Fortunately they were able to coax the octo into going away so that he could start breathing again.

Pacifistically yours,

Alex
 


squall7733

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Oct 19, 2005
Messages
98
Thanks :smile: Well my questions have been answered I'll just let it do its thing. As long as it doesnt decide it wants to eat me I have no problem with him grabing onto me lol
 

Latest Posts


Top