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[Non-Ceph?] Looking for Fossils on Mars

Dinomantis

Hatchling
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Joined
May 12, 2004
Messages
2
Possible cephalopod material from Gusev Crater

I've been collecting a large assortment of potential cephalopod-like fossil photos from both rovers, but I need some help in their identification.

I realize that we don't have a beak in the hand yet, but given the importance of what we may be seeing in this ancient Martian marine bed, I think you folks might enjoy a few samples of what I've found. I've spent literally weeks of endless hours collecting and attempting to vaguely categorize this interesting material, photographically.

I'm an avid collector of both marine and mineral specimens on earth, but my specialty is in a different area, mostly sharks, whales, etc.

The first photograph I've been told is possibly cephalopod-like, but since I can't find any good examples of this item on the net, let's see what you guys think. I need some direction in terms of possible taxonomy.[Original JPL Link]



Thank you.
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
602
Something is going down here, we've 3 moderators on board & all 3 have photographic evidence pertaining to the GMSS !!
Phil we know is a veritable goldmine of relevant data.
Tintenfisch is a darkhorse as I tend to camp here in Fossils & History but even our great & benevolent leader is also among us :notworth:

I'd like to fuel this debate of the masses with GMSS evidence from my neck of the woods. Before I continue, I am NOT from Norfolk I merely live here.

Attached is an aerial image I took from my hot air balloon GASBAG 1
of Grime's Graves but a stone's throw from where I sit & type. Also known as the Devil's holes.

I'm no code breaker but perlease Gri MeS(S) graves




Grime's originally was Grim's Graves & what could be more grim than some monstrous sand squid mooching about whilst you're trying to make a living in sunny Breckland. So which was 1st , the Martian or terrestrial GMSS ?
You tell me as I'm intellectually exhausted.

Here's a snap of Griselda enjoying a little flint knapping whilst guarding Grime's Graves from the attentions of the local paparazzi.



Dinomantis, sorry to disappoint but your photographic evidence is of Churchill the bulldog having been half buried.

 
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
602
Kevin, please no more questions, what we needs is answers.
too much pressure, another promotion !! now I've got to think of something else that is original to celebrate ! :bonk:
over here nurse !!
 

Phil

TONMO Supporter
Supporter
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Nov 19, 2002
Messages
3,033
Hi Dinomantis and welcome to TONMO. As you can see, we are all deadly-serious types around here.

:welcome:

I have done a little research on your Martian rock ceph and indeed, I think you have indeed located a fossil of the elusive Martiateuthis raybradburi

Here's a diagram I have compiled to help demonstrate:



A) Architeuthis on beach.
B) Architeuthis removed from background.
C) Head twisted 90 degrees to the left.
D) Your Martian fossil/rock.

Note the resemblance between C and D? Too much of a coincidence....
 

Phil

TONMO Supporter
Supporter
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
3,033
I've been checking out the NASA websites for images of the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter looking for evidence of the elusive GMSS (as one does). I found this intruiging image of the asteroid Gaspra with what appears to be a distant teuthid in hiding. I think that I may have stumbled upon an image of Gasprateuthis paintshopproi but I'm not sure. Anyone have any other ideas?

 
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
602
Phil, I'm sorry to pour cold water on Gasprateuthis but the published image is purely a "line of sight" phenomena. Everyone associated with asteroidal biology agrees that cephalopods can't exist on Gaspra, it's too damn grey, it's the wrong colour Gromit !
What was imaged was in fact a migrating GMSS. eggbound & heading to the spawning grounds on Europa.
It's common knowledge that the ice on Europa is regularly broken by comets & Roger the asteroid captured by the immense gravitational pull of Jupiter.
Just ask Mrs Shoemaker (R.I.P Mr. shoemaker :usa: :notworth: ) or Mr. Levy.

Word on the street is that GMSS are very sensitive to infra-sound & can hear these impacts even through the void of space & the low frequency vibration sets off the females urge to mate (similar behaviour is displayed by young human females on hearing a fat wallet hit the floor).
Apparently it is also common knowledge, having been posted in the public domain, that this migration is only possible due to the GMSS being able to "hold it's breath" as such, for immense periods. This is a trait acquired due to squid gills & bums being very much adjacent to each other :yuck:

With Earth's history of impacts & ice ages, I am willing to put my neck & reputation on the line state loud & proud that life on Earth started with an off-course GMSS migration. If you watch Stanley Kubricks documentary on the history & evolution of intelligent life you'll hear Dave Bowman say about the monolith "My god, it's full of squid !
We are squidkind. :archi:

erratum: "Roger the asteroid" should read "rogue asteroid" :oops:
 

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