NON-CEPH. Interesting marine discoveries.



TPOTH

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2004
Messages
280
chrono_war01 said:
So many Megamouths, what are they doing playing 'let's all die and let the humans examine us''?

It's more a problem of "let's fish more and more and we'll get weird stuff cuz we killed everything else" :mad:
Reminds me of that day we did a Deep Sea Conservation awareness thing with :oshea: and Matt. Some guy came along and told us that we should be thankful for bottom trawling because without it we'd never see those fish.... :roll:

TPOTH
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Messages
2,580
Maybe if they didn't trawl so much, we would've learned more about them. They should have given poeple research funds to find out more, then we will know how much we can catch and where to protect. It's really sad to know that much of these places are being destroyed without being seen in its natural form :sad:
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2003
Messages
290
Steve O'Shea said:
.incredible that a whale can be known from so few specimens ... ....

Actually ginko toothed whales are relatively common with 20 specimens recorded - Mesoplodon perrini, a new species of beaked whale is described on the basis of five animals stranded on the coast of California (between 32°55′N, 117°15′W and 36°37′N, 121°55′W) from May 1975 to September 1997, but then they are still finding new species of centipedes in New Yorks central park . . .
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2003
Messages
290
chrono_war01 said:
It's really sad to know that much of these places are being destroyed without being seen in its natural form :sad:

Unfortunately its not just trawling......the results of the January survey of bonobos in the Congo has just been announced: number of wild bonobos counted = zero.
 


Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Messages
2,580
It seems like that a lot of animals are becomeing extinct every year,month,day...I figure that if this continues for the next 2oo years, only polutry, cattle and other stuff we usually eat will be left, and the rainforest will be soon gone. Not to mention fishes and other creatures that can't be reared in a tank oir fish farm. A sa worrying thought. :cry: I hope the universe blows up before this happens, at least will be still called rich in wild life and species diversity :sad:
 

um...

Architeuthis
Registered
Joined
Sep 5, 2003
Messages
1,968
Don't worry too much. Rats, seagulls, cockroaches, parasitic worms, etc. are looking forward to some good times in the Razed New World we're working so hard to bring about. Anything that lives off of us or our trash is going to experience a healthy amount of habitat creation.
 

um...

Architeuthis
Registered
Joined
Sep 5, 2003
Messages
1,968
Here's a little piece about a new species of black coral discovered off southern California.

Many of the deepwater reefs in southern California harbor remarkably healthy communities of corals, sponges, and other large invertebrates," said Love. "This may be the case because, historically, there has been relatively little trawling over reefs in our area. What we need to know is the role that these large invertebrates play as deep-water habitats for fishes and other marine life."

See, Dr. Steve O'Shea, the fishermen must be right after all. There are plenty of spots they haven't got around to destroying yet.

Ban bottom trawling!
 

Steve O'Shea

TONMO Supporter
Supporter
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
4,671
Hmmmmm. Must be what the fisherfolk refer to as 'tiger country' - where their nets can't go.

There are a number of bathymetric and spatial refugia from fisheries impacts - some by default because of depth, some because of topography, and some because there aren't any fisheries stocks associated with them. But we're out to set aside representative areas, in addition to those that are truly unique or host weird, wonderful or otherwise spectacular fauna.

Nice to see that there are some areas that haven't been touched. I might add that there are NUMEROUS 'new species' out there; that just means that they haven't been described (some of these 'new species' have probably existed in collections for 50+ years, and they can be quite widespread in bathymetric and geographic distribution).

I met Dennis Opresko years ago (whilst at NIWA); he's responsible for identifying the 42 putative black coral species in New Zealand waters - a really top fellow!!! (Toxicologist by trade, if my recollection is correct, who works on antipatharian systematics as a bit of a hobby).
Cheers
O
 

Latest Posts


Top