new to the octopus world



KLtcb

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Aug 4, 2008
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thanks for the links
the previous owner is my x gf's older brother so i don't think i would really wanna talk to them lol

ill most likely get a brand new set up and probably more gallons
 
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KLtcb;122643 said:
anywayyyyy.

any youngins in the hobby? just wondering if anyone else my age keeps a SW tank

im 17

Zyan Silver was 17 or 18 when he was supplying some of the members here with tank-raised baby bimacs... if that's encouraging.
 

KLtcb

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thats awesome. i was reading i think on here an article about octopus care and it said that even unmated females can lay infertile eggs. which means that they arent hatchable? is it just luck that you buy a female and its already pregnent and then has babies? it seems that since their lifespans are unfortunetley short, it would be very cool to raise the babies and just keep it goin.. how does that work?
 


monty

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KLtcb;122655 said:
thats awesome. i was reading i think on here an article about octopus care and it said that even unmated females can lay infertile eggs. which means that they arent hatchable? is it just luck that you buy a female and its already pregnent and then has babies? it seems that since their lifespans are unfortunetley short, it would be very cool to raise the babies and just keep it goin.. how does that work?

It's usually bad luck. Octopuses can store sperm for months, so if the octo was wild-caught, she will most likely lay fertile eggs. Unfortunately, (almost all) octos die shortly after laying eggs, and the babies are very hard to raise in captivity. Large-egged octos are difficult but possible, with a whole lot of effort, resources, food cost, and so forth (and even then they have a relatively low success rate) and small-egged species have never been raised anywhere except in a professional laboratory (we get someone trying every few months, and no one has been successful.)

To hear about some successes with large egged species, look at gholland's and dwhatley's posts about their mercatoris mothers, Varys and Trapper. Mercatoris are not the most sociable octos, though, although with these examples they seem easier to raise to adulthood than other large-egged species. Zyan's experience is described in the TFH "ceph issue" article, but I don't think it's online anywhere yet.
 

KLtcb

Blue Ring
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Aug 4, 2008
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thanks for the info monty and the heads up chef reef, would just upgrading the skimmer be all i need? or would i also wanna get a canister filter?

thanks for the reply jean, its awesome to see kids in my age group that are also interested, in my area most of the people are older who are in the hobby.

Mike

Random BUT i saw Pineapple Express and just FYI, AWESOME MOVIE.
 

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