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nautilus necropsy - not for the faint of heart...

Michael Blue

Wonderpus
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Wow, some very interesting things going on there!

(And I particularly like your label on the "fingers", lol!)

Sorry again for your loss...
 

monty

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Fascinating pictures, although it's sad to think how much that infection would have impacted the animal. It's strange to wonder how applicable it is to anthropomorphise an animal whose brain evolved independently from our own, but I can't help but assume that they evolved a similar capacity to experience suffering.

Is the body usually that transparent?
 

OB

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Check for sequestration vs pigmentation, just for fun. The swelling might be secondary, as is true for most animals, most of the time (cytokine mediated immune response or blocking of efferent structures), I would suggest.

OMG, I just realized I have no proper understanding of cephalopods' humoral and cellular immune response, whatsoever :shock:
 

monty

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ob;93247 said:
Check for sequestration vs pigmentation, just for fun. The swelling might be secondary, as is true for most animals, most of the time (cytokine mediated immune response or blocking of efferent structures), I would suggest.

OMG, I just realized I have no proper understanding of cephalopods' humoral and cellular immune response, whatsoever :shock:

Yeah, I was struck by the news a few months back about how one of the big results for the sea urchin genome work was that echinoderms and vertebrates share some immune system traits, which made me realize I have no idea how non-deuterostome immune systems differ...
 

Phil

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Although the circumstances are sad, this is an absolutely fascinating thread. I don't think we've seen a Nautilus removed from it's shell before on this site so these pictures are really welcome, so thank you. Black and white diagrams just don't give any impression of the complexity and size of the living animal in the final chamber.

It really makes one think about the size of the living chamber in the rocky types. Can you see anything in the Hollingworth 'soft-body' ammonite picture that looks analogous to the Nautilus you have dissected? (Thanks for reposting these Kevin).
 

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robyn

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Erm....I'll give it a shot but I'll probably make an idiot of myself...

Personally I am unconvinced about this fossil - I would of course love to see it in person and my skepticism is probably because its hard to get a really good resolution image of it anywhere. Kind of looks like its filled with sediment to me.

I feel like I'm doing a Rorschach ink blot...

Anyway - here's my not-very-enlightening stab at it. Feel free to correct me if its totally off-base.
 

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Architeuthoceras

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On that fossil the clear or translucent portions are filled with calcite, so they were hollow when the calcite formed. The dark areas are probably matrix. Any area that would have had soft tissue would have to be in the clear area, the matrix would have filled in to the soft tissue, lithified, and then the soft tissue or area where the soft tissue was would be replaced with the calcite.
I think you are right in being unconvinced about the fossil, so am I.
That is a very nice reconstruction though, another master of PS among us. :cool2:
 

Jean

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hi Robyn,

Any chance Number one could have had a fungal infection? Similar lesions occur in abalone.........with similar results I'm afraid.

J
 
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