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My tank - starting from scratch



AprylWillis

GPO
Registered
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
112
Uhm...

can I say, "lol"?

Sorry...it just seems startling that someone will be able to successfully provide a home for reef fish in a 20 gallon.

I had a 20 gallon and I had to move my poor damsels into it. I was only able to house 3 fish and a bunch of fiddlers because of the waste the fish produce. If you get a decent skimmer, maybe you won't have a problem. My 20 gallon skimmer was rated for 35-40 gallons max.

I did frequent water changes and checked the PH and nitrates/nitrites. The Damsel didn't have enough room to swim, so I thought it was kind of cruel at first.

Even fish belong in a bigger aquarium than a 10-20 gallon.

Damsels are cheap and really good for tester fish to check everything out in your aquarium.

I used just gravel rock in my first aquarium--that way, you were able to see the waste better. I was only able to put in a few live rock.
 

team2jnd

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
Joined
Mar 24, 2007
Messages
11
I know many many people who keep fish in tanks all the way down to 5 gallons. I kept several fish in a ten gallon for several months while I cycled my 55. IT is very doable.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Messages
2,580
Okay, I have failed to find my protein skimmer, it might have gotten lost or it has developed legs and walked off in search of a mate. I don't know. All I know is that it's not there.

And my dad thinks that I should try keeping freshwater things first, instead of skipping to saltwater? Suggestions/Ideas/Comments on keeping freshwater fish to start out/learn the basics would be appreciated.

Oh, and 19inchs x 8 inchs wide and 28 inchs deep in gallons? I've put it through a calculater and it doesn't seem to be showing anything correlating with my hypothesis on the size of the darn thing.
 

Tintenfisch

Architeuthis
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
2,104
I come up with about 15 gallons (14.7), if there are 4.5 litres per gallon (though I've heard two different conversion figures - I guess there are two different 'gallons' - one is 4.5, one is 3.7 litres?)...
 


Jean

Colossal Squid
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
4,218
Tintenfisch;92407 said:
I come up with about 15 gallons (14.7), if there are 4.5 litres per gallon (though I've heard two different conversion figures - I guess there are two different 'gallons' - one is 4.5, one is 3.7 litres?)...


Yup US Gallons and UK Gallons are different!

J
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
21,000
chrono_war,
Your dad won't like my thinking but ...

I don't believe you will learn much about saltwater fish/reef keeping by setting up your tank for freshwater. If you enjoy freshwater fish or just fish in general, you will like this kind of setup but the differences are extensive. Even if your dad thinks you need to learn about the daily routine of keeping a tank, the amount of work required for saltwater is 10 times more (and far more critical) than for freshwater.

You might want to start by looking at a couple of nano forums to see what beginner critters attract you and not try to keep something exotic until you have experience. Beginner (read hardy and low cost) critters don't have to be boring. Live rock, sand, interesting cleanup, a couple of softies and a pair of jaw fish make a really interesting small tank. There are a number of options depending upon your tastes and how much time/money (particularly for feeding) you have to put into the project. Saltwater tanks are, however, a daily concern and require at least freshwater top off every 24 hours and water changes weekly for the smaller tanks. If your time does not allow daily attention, then a freshwater tank is more forgiving but you will learn very little about reef keeping.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Messages
2,580
good, because my dad just had a colleague say the exact same thing to him. Saltwater and freshwater don't match. Anywho, the tank is going nicely, I have built a list of what to buy. But what type of sandbed do I want if I want to keep a cuttle? I was thinking of a deep sandbed, but I have no idea what to do with such a small tank except for keeping juvnile cuttles and then releasing them back to sea.
 
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
672
A few years back, I kept a 10g fresh as my first tank because I wanted a spotted green puffer. I wouldn't say I learned a ton, but I did learn a lot about how water quality is important, the nitrification process, and how some fish don't mix (puffers and guppies :roll:). So I wouldn't say keeping a fresh will teach you nothing, but a FOWLR tank may be better if you are looking into a ceph or some other type of salty critter.
 

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