Monsters of the deep

Steve O'Shea

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True; hopefully the days of 60-foot x 1-ton Architeuthis accounts are numbered. I looked at that scaled diagram, and Mesonychoteuthis really must be one massive hunk of squid.

We've spent years trying to bring down the maximum sizes and weights for Architeuthis, and then we go and propose an even larger/heavier squid, but I can assure you that I can sleep at night, comfortable in knowing that we're not misleading any of you (and grateful for the fact I'm not in the water down there in the Antarctic!!)!
Cheers
O
 
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From the standpoint of Architeuthis duchess, I would imagine that the "metre-long penis" more than makes up for any deficiency in the intellectual department.... :roflmao:

Speaking of which -- what will happen if the Archi tries to mate with the submersible? Talk about "bait and switch"!

:shock:
 

WhiteKiboko

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not a bad article.... i liked the size comparison chart, or maybe was just amused by the little diver guy....
 
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Steve O'Shea said:
It makes all of us look a little stupid at the same time ... because we have yet to capture the elusive imagery of the world's most stupid squid on film. Maybe it is smarter than we think, or does its thinking in places other than its brain.
Cheers
O

Hi, new to the forum & loving it! Just wanted to say it could be simply another anthropomorphic interpretation, but another thing that has given me an impression of intelligence in the large squid is the account of some divers photographing Humboldt squid off the coast of Baja California or perhaps further south, I don't remember for sure. But the squid grouped around them, did a red/white flashing pulse, and then attacked, making bruises like those from a baseball bat through the divers' chain-mail suits with their tentacle clubs. Then an especially huge one, 8 feet long if I recall correctly, slowly came up in front of one of the divers who was isolated, causing the others to be terrified for her. It just stayed at equal depth with her and seemed to quietly regard her for a minute or two, and then swam away, and the others followed.
The way it makes me like to think about it, of course, is that perhaps the big one was like a "wise elder" that could distinguish the human beings as not worthy prey.
I began to get especially interested in Humboldt Squid after visiting Monterey Bay Aquarium and seeing footage of the squid they had shot there. I didn't realize Humboldt squid might range that far north, thinking because of their name that they were only off the coast of South America. Thought it was cool that they might actually be up here by Humboldt County, California, too (so named because the Humboldt Meridian passes through this county, which is the farthest west point in the 48 contiguous states (and the second-farthest north on the coast of California's 55 some-odd counties).

Anyhow, I see from your later post that Architeuthis seems to have rather different hunting methods than Humboldt squid, but isn't it also known to surface, as Mesonychoteuthis did?

:shock: Again, it is astonishingly cool to be able to leave a message for the singular Steve O'Shea :biggrin2:, and all sorts of other people sharing info on these endlessly interesting creatures.

--Bill
 

Steve O'Shea

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DoubleBill said:
:shock: Again, it is astonishingly cool to be able to leave a message for the singular Steve O'Shea :biggrin2:, and all sorts of other people sharing info on these endlessly interesting creatures.
--Bill

LOL; thanks for that post Bill; ommastrephid squid (of which the Humboldt is an example) are rather powerful oceanic swimmers. I've had a small one (< 1 foot long) draw blood, leaving a rather gaping wound on my arm .... as I was petting it for the camera's benefit. An 8-foot animal would have me out of the water in seconds!

Architeuthis doesn't naturally come to the surface (like the colossal squid, Mesonychoteuthis), except in its larval stage (or unless it is dead/dying), so I think you're quite safe being in the water. Of course I could be wrong .... :goofysca:
 
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Steve O'Shea said:
so I think you're quite safe being in the water. Of course I could be wrong .... :goofysca:

Forgive my goulishness, but that truly has to be one of the coolest things about these animals and your work, Steve. The sea monsters we've all heard of and pooh-poohed do, in fact, exist. Not only are they utterly fascinating and flabbergasting bundles of bizzarre and beautiful biology (hey! alliteration! :heee: ), they are terrifying animals that deserve healthy respect, and may prove to ultimately remind us that we are STILL one kind of animal among many with all that entails (such as potentially being on someone's menu... :shock: )

rusty
 

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