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May be a stupid ? BUt want to know

BuShIdO

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Jul 7, 2003
Messages
27
off the topic

I was wondering if it is possable to kill Bristle worms, when i took down my old reef tank it was crawling with them. I got the tank outside and pressure washed it then i took all the dead corals and pressure washed them with both extreamly hot and freezeing cold water. Then i took them and set them on the black-top driveway( on a very hot and sunny day). I left to brin all the live corals and fish to a local fish store and decided to look around for a few hours (altogether about 4-5 hours gone). I got home and filled up my tank, the water was chilled. I went outside and picked up the rocks and started to place them in. The next day i seen a DEAD Bristle worm on the sand. Now about half a year later (i have not added anything to the tank other than the fish for starting the tank) im findng live Bristle worms. I find it hard to belive that anything could live though that but theys things refuse to give up.

*Thankfully i got smart and put on some heavy rubber gloves when i took down the reef tank to prevent any stings*

Anyone know of a way to kill them other than a preditor?
 
Joined
Nov 22, 2002
Messages
52
Freshwater will kill Bristleworms very quickly. The problem is many rocks are porous and would need extended exposure to freshwater for it to penetrate into the rock & kill the Bristleworms. Small Bristleworms seem to be able to get into impossibly small crevices.
For natural control, have a seen large Triggerfish take Bristleworms on occasion. If the inhabitants are crustacean friendly then Arrow Crabs (Stenorhynchus sp.) are natural predators of Bristleworms. Arrow Crabs are reef safe in my experience.

J.Scott
 

Colin

TONMO Supporter
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Joined
Nov 14, 2002
Messages
3,985
Also worth noting that there is a reason why there are so many worms and thats because of teh system itself.... IE there needs to be a lot of waste food there to support a population in the first place.

Personally i think that they are a good way of removing excess food which our cephy friends are prone to making!
Hooray for Bristle worms!
 

BuShIdO

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Jul 7, 2003
Messages
27
well after pressure washing the stones there was a big puddle and when i got back there were still b. worms crawling around in that puddle. I dont them other than they make rock moveing kinda scarry. And with an octo tank i dont think there is a way to get rid of them, i get the fealing that an arrow crab wont last long.
 

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