Hello Octo lovers

DWhatley

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When you do a water change, ie take water out and replace it, always use saltwater. When you replace evaporated water, always use freshwater.
 

West1

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When you do a water change, ie take water out and replace it, always use saltwater. When you replace evaporated water, always use freshwater.

Yes. Replacing water from a water change I knew. Adding to the evaporation I did not.

Update on the merc...

Stays under a rock 24/7. Only one dwarf hermit crab left of the 11 I put in. I purchased frozen half clams and will starve the little guy until Friday. I will add a piece of clam daily and hope he comes out for some food (banded serpent star or emerald crab will likely eat what's not been eaten).
 

sirreal

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I may have missed it but do you have a red light on the tank? Do you check at night? For me it seemed that after Mercs get settled they go back to being very nocturnal. I used to set an alarm for 3 am just to check. I know its a pain but maybe you can try.
 

West1

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I do not have a red light. I have a current usa light over the tank, maybe that's why he doesn't come out.
I do wake up for work @3am and have checked the tank at different times within the hour (different days and times) with no sign of an octo.

His appetite sure is big, he took down a great size emerald crab. Im shocked he went to town on him!
 

DWhatley

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The excessive appetite may be one of two things. It could be acclimation to the strange environment or it could be a female preparing to lay eggs.
 

tonmo

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29g is way to small for an octo, even a small species.
i'm glad you posted that, i wasn't sure if we were really talking about a 29g tank.

History has told us time and again, an octopus needs 55 gallons+. Depends on species, but our general rule of thumb has been, better safe than sorry 55 gallons and up. In many cases 55 gallons will not do, either.
 

DWhatley

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For the mediums sized species we keep, a 55 with sump (or larger) is definitely strongly recommended. HOWEVER, a 29 gallon is a GOOD size for dwarfs (even for a pair of mercs, I have raised a pair in a well filtered, often water changed 15 very successfully - the largest I have used for mercs is a 45 and kept 3 of them in the same tank with lots of live rock). A 55 gallon tank is really too large for a dwarf species unless you are trying to keep a small community. A single dwarf in a 55 would never be seen and there would be no way to ensure it was eating. A 29 is also quite appropriate for a baby octopus of a larger species. As the hatchling grows larger, it would then need to be moved but the smaller tank is preferred while they are young for the same reasons it is appropriate for a dwarf.
 

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