Hello from UC Berkeley

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,995
000generic,
Is there a reason you need to raise them in the lab (ie do they have to be related for the gene work)? Mexico has developed a nursery program for O. maya that might be an unstudied animal, one with food value (so funding might be more forthcoming) and is large egged. It IS a larger animal and I am not sure of housing requirements or if you can work out something with the university attached to the nursery work since my total exposure is the little that I have found in the news:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/umrsmas/bullmar/1966/00000016/00000003/art00012
http://www.fis.com/fis/worldnews/wo...&special=&monthyear=&day=&id=41181&ndb=1&df=0
http://www.panoramaacuicola.com/noticias/2010/03/24/octopus_maya_farming_progresses_in_yucatan_.html
 

000generic

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Jul 20, 2011
Messages
16
I gave O.maya serious consideration (particularly since my family has a house in Campeche) and I would be very interested in producing a staging series, if there is not one already, but like you point out, the adults are medium large. Most of the research techniques I would like to develop/see developed require working with early stages of development. So breeding animals are required in the lab. And a medium-sized lab would need new embryos on a weekly basis, if possible year round. So a fair number of adults are needed, meaning small adults. But I haven't seen the animal in person, or the facilities that have been developed for it, so its possible it could work in a lab environment that is not overly space limited for culturing. But for many labs, the space requirements would make it a less than perfect choice I suspect.

But O.maya is great for the reasons you suggest. I'm looking forward to hearing about current efforts with it at CIAC. Thanks for all the links!
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,995
As a thought, if you have extra animals, is it outside of the University ethics requirements to offer them to the public? If you could charge a nominal fee (shipping is expensive, somewhere in the neighborhood of $75-100 for the required overnight) and could sell a few (the market is not large), this might help a little with financing (I know not of the world of grants and restrictions so don't laugh if this is way outside a reality check. There is also the time involved for packing and shipping that might not make the thought worth while). To date, there are no CB animals available so even captive born might make them attractive to keepers. I know you can't do this with bimacs but most other octos don't carry their restrictions.

A warm water species would also reduce the costs of keeping them in both equipment needed and ability to home extras. Octopus briareus is not commercially harvested but is plentiful and large egged. I have personally raised two from hatchling but was not successful in raising any young from the mating of the two tank born from a WC female. I would expect a lab would have a better chance. However, these are again a larger species (smaller mantle size but longer arms).

The other species I can think of that is relatively (note the relative) easy to raise is O. mercatoris. We have not seen many of them lately though. These are a dwarf species that can be housed together if obtained from the same initial housing (usually live rock) or born from the same hatching. We have had several member to successfully raise hatchlings from tank born pairs.

Since you are at Berkeley, I assume you have talked to Roy about other potential species.
 

000generic

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Jul 20, 2011
Messages
16
O.briareus and O.mercatoris are both great suggestions. And Roy and his lab are an incredible resource here at Berkeley. I'd be happy to share extra animals, for species where its legal, but have no idea as to university or other requirements etc. Also, I'm literally just past my second month with my first clutch, so shipping extras to a select few outside research is still a ways down the road, but its an idea I'm open to if it would be straight forward.

Sorry, but what does CB and WC stand for.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,995
LOL, and I am the old ... person that can't read text speak :biggrin2:

WC wild caught, CB captive bred

I was thinking about much further down the road and didn't realize you had eggs that you were already watching.

While looking for an article about the O. maya aquaculture facility I came across a fairly recent abstract discussing the study of 3 different first foods (link posted in the Article and Journal Links sticky in the Raising Octopus from Eggs forum). Only the abstract is free but you may have access through the university. The gist of the abstract confirms what we already think we know, brine shrimp and freshwater animals are not the best foods for hatchlings where much better survival was seen with the saltwater feed. I don't remember what else is in that list but you might look through it for ideas.
 

Latest Posts


Top