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Hello from Huntsville

CNeighbors

Cuttlefish
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Oct 8, 2015
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19
Hello Everyone,

I have been lurking here for about a week now. I have been reading and learning about these fascinating creatures from your great site. I have a long way to go.

For the last few years I have been out of the hobby. I took a ten week contract job out of town and had to shut down what I had. Once I got back I never started it back up. The cost of restocking plus the cost to run a fish room was simply too much. Before I shut down I was working with and breeding Cichlids from Lake Tanganyika in Africa.

I am ready to try something different as I have never kept a SW tank. The Tanganyikan's that I kept did require excellent water quality so most of my tanks are drilled and I have wet/dry sumps. I am not sure how much of a learning curve I have to overcome. I like working with my hands so I will probably try building a DIY skimmer. We will have to wait and see how that goes. I am hoping to get a tank set up by the first of the year. Will start cycling with Damsels and some live rock and see how it goes. I know I need to be reef ready to keep Cephalopods. However I have no interest in a reef tank. So how do I get reef ready without a reef tank? On the upside I am used to rearing tanks and maintaining a live food supply.

At the end of the day my goal is to acquire and breed tank raised Sepia Bandensis.

Thanks to all involved for this wealth of information on Cephalopods!
 

tonmo

Cthulhu
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:welcome: to TONMO and thanks for joining! You have come to the right place :smile: looking forward to tracking your adventure :thumbsup:
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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You will find saltwater a different experience from your freshwater adventure. You will want to add a skimmer to your hardware and include different biological filtration (typically in the form of live rock). Cycle time is extended and a minimum of 3 months active cycling will give you your best start for a ceph environment.
 

CNeighbors

Cuttlefish
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Oct 8, 2015
Messages
19
Thanks for the replies!

I have been reading and learning. The ability to remove waste with a skimmer is a very nice option to have. I read a study yesterday using several different setups and the varying oxygen levels. Link Here http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2005-08/eb/index.php This is what I have in mind so far:

75 gallon main tank w/ overflow, 150ish lbs of live rock, 2" of argonite sand, 400 watts of lighting.
Sump with skimmer section, 40 gallon Refugium section with chaeto , copepods and amphipods, and a return section.
 

CNeighbors

Cuttlefish
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I forgot 600 watts of lighting on the refugium at night when the main tank lights are off.

Edit: In my mind the more nitrate and phosphate I can remove using chaeto the better.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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You will still need some form of mechanical/chemical filtration, the skimmer only removes dissolved organics. My preferred method is to place a large (7" dia) filter sock containing a mesh bag of charcoal where the display dumps into the sump. There are numerous other combinations successfully favored by other aquarists. If you use a filter sock you will want to start with a larger micron pore, eventually reducing the pore size after the tank is well cycles as starting with too small a pore size will result in needing to change the sock daily :rolleyes2:. A 200 micron sock is typical to start then reducing to 100 or less after a year or so. A charcoal bag can be passively left in the sump but I prefer to have the water running over it for slightly more active filtration and I never have to deal with yellow water.

The ceph care forum has a sticky (yellow bar at top of forum) titled Posts with Info for new Octopus Keepers that that contains links to prior discussions on octopus habitats. The Tank Talk forum has a similar sticky titled Tank Buildouts with links to some of the better documented buildouts that may help contribute to your design.

Many cephs are nocturnal and you may want want a night light for viewing the activity. Use red lighting, not blue for any nocturnal observations. It will not bother diurnals and you will see far more foraging behavior with the nocturnals.
 
Last edited:

CNeighbors

Cuttlefish
Registered
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Oct 8, 2015
Messages
19
You will still need some form of mechanical/chemical filtration, the skimmer only removes dissolved organics. My preferred method is to place a large (7" dia) filter sock containing a mesh bag of charcoal where the display dumps into the sump. There are numerous other combinations successfully favored by other aquarists. If you use a filter sock you will want to start with a larger micron pore, eventually reducing the pore size after the tank is well cycles as starting with too small a pore size will result in needing to change the sock daily :rolleyes2:. A 200 micron sock is typical to start then reducing to 100 or less after a year or so. A charcoal bag can be passively left in the sump but I prefer to have the water running over it for slightly more active filtration and I never have to deal with yellow water.

I was thinking of using a sponge and charcoal in the sump baffles but your method might be easier.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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It is unlikely you can get too much CO2 Oxygen exchange but I have never added (I hate the stuff but do use it on occasion) Chaeto directly to the main display (my nitrate levels are normally high but this is common for a ceph tank as well as with large fish tanks with high waste). When I do use it (my sumps are not lighted) I will put it in my overflow box (weir) to keep the mess minimized. It is also common to use it in a breeder net when keeping baby cuttles but that is more for the cuttles to hide and hunt in than for its oxygen benefit.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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I was thinking of using a sponge and charcoal in the sump baffles but your method might be easier.
Way, way easier to maintain and to remember to change out the carbon. I keep multiple socks available as well as multiple bags of charcoal so that I can swap out the set each week. I rinse the charcoal and then keep it in fresh RO/DI water for the next use. When rinsing no longer shows any dust, I usually replace it. Since I rotate the bags and socks (I have multiple tanks), I don't quite know how long it takes before I refill with new charcoal. I always rinse the charcoal but the socks are allowed to pile up and for a bit :oops:

I recommend using a nylon ZIPPERED bag. Avoid the string tied as they are all but impossible to untie. This is the style I buy (I buy from different vendors so this is not a vendor recommendation but will likely be fine - check the feed back before choosing though). The only issue I have had with them is the aluminum zipper pull will eventually break, then I use them to cover my Koralias :biggrin2:
 

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